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I'm kind of new to networking, so please bear the long post.

I wanted to set up a 10G Ethernet peer-to-peer network on the same computer (basically two SFP+ transceivers on the same NIC that are connected to each other over fiber) before I try to connect two computers together.

I have an Intel X520-2 NIC with SFP+ ports on a machine running Windows 10. I did the following steps in order:

  1. Hot fixed two Solid Optics tunable DWDM SFP+ transceiver so they're compatible with the Intel NIC using this tool: http://solid-optics.com/tools/multi-fiber-tool/so-multi-fiber-tool-id1768.html

  2. Install Intel NIC and install its latest drivers, then reboot

  3. Open Network Settings, and configure different IP addresses + subnet masks to the two Intel X520-2 network adapters according to this YouTube tutorial: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=set+up+10g+ethernet+home+network&view=detail&mid=D4B96D48532697B45A4DD4B96D48532697B45A4D&FORM=VIRE

  4. Change the C:/Windows/System32/drivers/etc/hosts file to include the two IP addresses, then reboot

I get no network between the two adapters when I open Network Connections in Windows. I reset my TCP/IP, IPV4 and Winsock stacks via Command Prompt but that didn't do the trick either.

How do I proceed? I just want to be able to drag and drop files from one folder to another over fiber on the same computer.

  • ok, as @Tim_Stewart said in his answer - without a router you cant get from one subnet to another. so if you configure both cards in the same subnet - it should work. not sure if fiber does auto-negotiate as the 1Gb RJ45 NICs nowadays do and switch Rx/TX if needed. – Zina Feb 14 '18 at 23:47
  • @zina it's not possible to mdi-x on fiber cards. It's because tx is a laser or LED, and RX is a laser/light detecting module. There is no logically switching send and receive. It would be awesome though! ;) – Tim_Stewart Feb 20 '18 at 17:44
  • @Tim_Stewart - thanks for the info. If I would have used my brain would probably notice it :) – Zina Feb 20 '18 at 17:52
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Two computers without a fiber-optic capable router in-between should be on the same subnet.

I.e pc1 on 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0 And pc2 on 10.10.10.20 255.255.255.0

You may also have to make a cross-over with your fiber cable. I.e switch tx/rx on one end. You release the plastic bridge on the fiber optic connector clip to do this.

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