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I have cable internet and WiFi at my house. When I moved in I asked the provider tech what I needed to get WiFi to my workshop about 240 feet away. He said to get direct burial coax cable (I forget the rg#) and a WiFi router. I had a sub-contractor bury the proper cable and connect it to coax on the pole with a splinter. I acquired a WiFi router and attempted to connect only to be informed by my cable provider that they would have to charge me for second internet connection. That's a no go, considering that I don't need it that bad. My workshop/man-cave has a smart TV that's used only occasionally.

So, can I connect the house router to the coax going to the shop via a LAN - coax adapter, and then have functional WiFi out there?

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To run Ethernet over coax, you need two MoCA adapters, one at each end. For a high-end system with high speed, you could use bonded MoCA 2.0. Each adapter would cost around $60.

Connecting to the pole with a splitter doesn't make much sense. There's no way to get your Internet access back to the pole. I hope it's not too much trouble to get that line to go all the way to your router -- where the Internet access is.

If that's not feasible, ignore the coax and use a point-to-point wireless link.

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The cable tech told you wrong. You need direct-burial Ethernet (make sure the direct-bury cable complies with Cat5e or better), not direct-burial coax.

In your house, you connect the Ethernet cable to a LAN port on your main home gateway router, and in your workshop, you connect a Wi-Fi AP (just about any Wi-Fi router can act as an AP if you adjust settings and connect it correctly).

Trying to do MoCA, Powerline networking (HomePlug, G.Hn), or wireless point-to-point or mesh links is never as fast, stable, and reliable as Ethernet between your Wi-Fi APs.

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They shouldn't have told you to install that cable. Direct burial Ethernet would have worked just fine, what you do have is another cable connection going to your work shop. so at the very least you can put another box there for t.v

A wireless bridge would also work just fine in this range.

additionally you could probably use a power-line Ethernet extender if the workshop is connected to the A.C mains at your house.

or you could go for Moca 2.0/2.5 adapters like this,

but they are usually half-duplex and performance may not reach the advertised specification depending on your category cabling you have in the ground.

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