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After doing research on Google, I couldn't find answer to this question. Is Hard Disk Drive a part of motherboard or not? When talking about Tower Case System Unit, the HDD is seperate from the motherboard but connected to it. So, does it mean that HDD is the part of motherboard?

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this question shows that the asker has not attempted even the most basic research before asking the question. – Jamie Hanrahan Dec 23 '18 at 1:18
  • if HDD is a part of the motherboard then you can never replace it, upgrade it or put another HDD into the CPU case – phuclv Dec 23 '18 at 3:40
  • The question is basically: if the hard drive is not part of the motherboard, is it part of the motherboard? It makes no sense. – fixer1234 Dec 23 '18 at 21:06
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No. The Hard Drive (HDD) is a separate part from the motherboard. The hard drive connects to the motherboard typically using SATA, which is like USB, but for internal interface devices (CD-Drive/HDD/RGB Controller)

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A hard-drive is never part of a motherboard.
However, there are SSD hard-drives that connect directly to the motherboard and work way faster than SATA cables.
Check out NVMe PCIe M.2.
I have one, and Windows 10 loads in less than 2 seconds since power on. It's also due to fast memory and processor, but it's 100% contributed by this hard drive too.

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    Even in cases such as you describe, the SSD is not "part of the motherboard". Connecting directly to PCIe does not make it "part of the motherboard". RAM DIMMs aren't considered "part of the motherboard" either. – Jamie Hanrahan Dec 23 '18 at 1:20
  • I completely agree, and I stated that in my answer. However it's still a closer step to what the OP has described. Besides I thought for the reference it won't hurt posting this here. – Shimmy Weitzhandler Dec 23 '18 at 2:28
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    no, it doesn't hurt. I just thought it's important to not leave wiggle room for misunderstanding. – Jamie Hanrahan Dec 23 '18 at 7:57

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