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I have thomson twg870ug modem/router as a gateway in my home LAN. I've set the password for the modem config page. The odd thing is that i can access router config page at 8080 port but the password and/or username i use locally (from LAN) isn't valid for outside connections. I have defined forwarding rules for port 21, 22, 80, 8080 so i can connect to services from internet. The only odd thing is that i can access router config page at 8080 port but the password and/or usernme i use locally (from LAN) isn't valid for outside connections.

  • If it runs on standard port 80, your ISP could be blocking access. – ivanivan Mar 13 '18 at 17:14
  • No it runs pn 8080 port. – Ringger81 Mar 13 '18 at 18:11
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    Try moving the port to something "not typical" - 8080 and 8000 are also typically blocked. Try 3149 or some other equally "random" port.... – ivanivan Mar 13 '18 at 18:32
  • Does your IP do carrier grade NAT? Do you have a fixed IP address? Can you access any of your local machines from the Internet (or WAN, if you want) at all? – dirkt Mar 14 '18 at 11:45
  • @dirkt Yes, i have defined forwarding rules for port 21, 22, 80, 8080 so i can connect to services from internet. The only odd thing is that i can access router config page at 8080 port but the password and/or usernme i use locally (from LAN) isn't valid for outside connections... – Ringger81 Mar 14 '18 at 17:28
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I'm going to recommend that you don't enable Remove Config Management. You make your entire network vulnerable by doing so. See this blog article where the author outlines the dangers of allowing remote access to Thomson routers:

https://research.kudelskisecurity.com/2017/01/06/do-not-create-a-backdoor-use-your-providers-one/

In particular, the article mentions that ISP often hardcode a username and password for their use in accessing your router remotely. While this may be perfectly acceptable for remote support by the ISP, it also provides a potential avenue for hackers to take control of your router.

I would recommend installing a remote desktop client like Teamviewer (www.teamviewer.com, free for personal use) on a computer on your LAN, connecting to that computer and using it to access your router when needed.

  • An SSH server is another (smaller/faster) option – Xen2050 Mar 13 '18 at 21:24
  • Although SSH is secure when data is in transit, it is only as secure as the username/password pair used on the router. And many (most?) ISP routers don't allow the customer to set a limit on the number of invalid login attempts before an attacker is locked out. So enabling SSH on an ISP router is not recommended. – Jason Huebel Oct 10 '18 at 13:51
  • I was thinking of using a key(pair) with ssh, my almost 15 year old consumer dd-wrt/openwrt router supported them, but isp's are funny sometimes, so running the ssh server on another of their devices might be better, then connect to the router "from inside the house" – Xen2050 Oct 10 '18 at 18:52

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