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Silly question: I thought I knew what an implication was, until looking into this. I'd like to confirm the definition of implied in the context of Windows command prompt switches. For example:

  • If the description for switch /R says (implies /F), does that mean that using this switch automatically also includes /F regardless of whether I add it?

  • Or is it just strongly suggested that I add /F?

The dictionary definitions below seem to contradict one another...

implied  (ɪmˈplaɪd)  adj

1. hinted at or suggested; not directly expressed:
          There was no express or implied restriction on its use.

impliedly adv

Source: Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged ©2014

   

im-ply  (ĭm-plī′) tr.v. im-plied, im-ply-ing, im-plies

1. a. To express or state indirectly: She implied that she was in a hurry.
  b. To make evident indirectly: His fine clothes implied that he was wealthy.

2. To involve by logical necessity; entail: Life implies growth and death.

Source: American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language ©2016


I've seen the term used in /? listings for CHKDSK, CLEANMGR and others...
CHKDSK Screenshot

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    "Implies" is used in the formal logic sense: A -> B (A implies B) means that, if A is true, then B is necessarily true. So, if /R is specified, then the effect of /F is automatically invoked without its being explicitly included in the options. – AFH Mar 30 '18 at 11:59
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With the DOS/Windows Command Prompt, implies ... means that you do not have to specify both switches; specifying the one that implies the other is sufficient. In the example you present, if you are specifying any of /R, /X, or /B, you need not specify /F as well, as CHKDSK will fix any errors it finds, which is what /F does.

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  • Alright, thanks — that's what I hypothesized; I just wanted to make sure. It's kinda of crucial information! – ashleedawg Mar 30 '18 at 12:28
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I thought I knew what an implication was, until looking into this.

What did you think it was?

If the description for switch /R says (implies /F), does that mean that using this switch automatically also includes /F regardless of whether I add it?

yes

Or is it just strongly suggested that I add /F?

heh, no

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  • That is what I thought it meant - until I noticed that half the dictionary definitions say it's a "suggestion" so I figured it's safer to confirm since it's pretty crucial information. – ashleedawg Mar 30 '18 at 12:24
  • @ashleedawg technical people don't tend to use the suggestion definition. – barlop Mar 30 '18 at 13:01
  • Every rule has it's exception, and it doesn't hurt to confirm doubts by asking questions... especially in a Q&A forum. (In fact, it benefits both the Q'ers and the A'ers, in multiple ways.) Now I'll never wonder about that again, and didn't have to risk an assumption, and "one day" someone else will be wondering the same thing and this post will solve their question too - with even less effort than it did for me. Thanks again! :) – ashleedawg Mar 30 '18 at 13:06
  • @ashleedawg I think you asked a reasonable question. Also, I'm not aware of any exception to what you refer to as "the rule". – barlop Mar 30 '18 at 13:25
  • @ashleedawg and even if you did look at it as a suggestion, you could then question whether that means A)A suggestion that it already does blah or B)A suggestion that you should do blah(like a recommended usage). But it's not a suggestion so it's not A or B, and it's certainly not 'B'. It's a statement of certainty that it already does blah and that therefore you don't need to be explicit in telling it to do blah. – barlop Apr 1 '19 at 18:47

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