34

How can I find out BIOS version in Windows without rebooting the system? I would gladly spare finding out the shortcut to enter BIOS and search in BIOS.

  • I'm curious as to what you'd need it for that you don't need to restart, and that you'd trust windows to tell you what it is. – Mazura May 5 '18 at 1:21
50

Press Win + R & enter msinfo32

Then you can navigate and look for all kinds of information, including the BIOS version.

  • 3
    In fact, since Windows Vista, pressing the Win key and typing msinfo32 will also work. – Andreas Rejbrand May 4 '18 at 17:47
  • 1
    @AndreasRejbrand Run is faster though. You might have to wait up to 3 seconds because the indexing for Windows search is the worst IMO (at least until Win7). – Ahmed Abdelhameed May 4 '18 at 19:36
  • @AhmedAbdelhameed: I know. On my Windows 7 PC, though, it is very fast. But I also have a Windows 10 PC, and there - for some reason - it is much slower. – Andreas Rejbrand May 4 '18 at 20:34
  • 1
    "It works on my machine" – Mom344 Jan 29 at 13:00
28

You also can find out your BIOS version on cmd typing:

wmic bios get smbiosbiosversion

It will return only the version. msinfo32, as @stendarr said, will provide you all the information about the BIOS

Hope this helps!

  • A black window appears but it vanishes as quickly as it appears. I wonder what could be added to the command line to make this "DOS screen" stay. – CopperKettle May 3 '18 at 19:03
  • 6
    @CopperKettle You should use the command line, not the run box. You'll want cmd /k "wmic bios get smbiosbiosversion" for that. – wizzwizz4 May 3 '18 at 19:18
14

As a third option using Powershell:

 Get-WmiObject win32_bios

You can find the other possible properties by piping Get-WmiObject win32_bios to get-member to show the other possible properties.

  • You don't have to type "select SMBIOSBIOSversion" just read it from the line! Nonetheless +1 good answer! – Stackcraft_noob May 5 '18 at 3:06
  • Ah, I added that part after checking to see what information the OP was seeking, and didn't catch that it was visible by default, since there's a lot of information that Powershell doesn't show by default. – Davidw May 5 '18 at 6:54
4

I have found a registry key containing the BIOS version, which could be useful if you need to access this information from some software:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\SystemBiosVersion
  • In Powershell: Get-ItemProperty HKLM:\HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\ | Select SystemBiosVersion (With more detail) or Get-ItemProperty HKLM:\HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\BIOS\ | Select BIOSVersion (Just raw version string same as @Davidw 's answer) – Zhenhir May 4 '18 at 8:51
  • +1 Good for the first! But plz descripe also how! Open CMD -> systeminfo | findstr /I /c:bios -> wmic bios get manufacturer, smbiosbiosversion -> reg query HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\BIOS -> view for "BIOSVersion" – Stackcraft_noob May 5 '18 at 3:14
1

If you like to use third-party software ...

CPU-Z can do this :

CPU-Z Screen Shot

Of course there are several other tools that can give you this information, you just have to Google for System information software!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.