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I've got a modem connected using a coax cable on the ground level. I would like to move it to the loft.

Next to the coax box for the modem on the ground level, there is also another box with a TV socket (coax). The TV socket is connected to an antenna installed in my loft.

Can I patch the internet connection (coax) to the tv socket (coax) and move the modem upstairs? Could I face any problems with the network speed? My current internet connection is 200/20 Mbps. Could it go possible lower ? I assume the coax cable in the wall for the TV is no longer than 20 meters.

just a note: I don't use the antenna and I'm not planning to do so in the future. So I was thinking about disconnecting it and using the cable which is already wired in for the modem.

current setup: I have a fiber optic internet connection. the optic socket is outside of my house, which is connected using a very short coaxial cable (1m) through the wall to my living room downstairs - my ISP put the modem down there as well. next to the modem, there is a coax tv socket on the wall socket- I suppose this is connected to the antenna in the loft. I want to disconnect the antenna and move the modem into the loft.

I don't use cable TV / aerial TV. The modem is for my internet connection only.

  • This is more a question about the needs and capabilities of your ISP to communicate with your modem. If you have cable TV service, you should be able to connect the same cables to a TV receiver and if it works properly, your modem probably should as well. Lacking TV service, call up your ISP, make the change, and have them track the modem and make sure everything is working. – music2myear May 25 '18 at 22:22
  • I have an outlet for my cable modem - and four outlets for my Foxtel TV - they all work for either purpose - I only use two outlets and there is no difference in speed - at one stage I used one outlet with a splitter - this also worked with no speed loss (I have paid for the speed boost and when I do measure get 115 M download speeds) ok - I do now have a amplifier fitted I'm in Australia so 115M and 2M up is very fast for us – Ross May 25 '18 at 23:32
  • my ISP is not willing to extend the connection to the loft due to some health & safety rules for their technicians. They recommended to use an udp cable from the modem and run it wherever I need it. But I don't want to drill a hole onto a lots of walls / ceiling etc.. That's why I wanted to use the existing coaxial cable – emte May 26 '18 at 6:35
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One caveat to this answer is do you mean the Aerial sockets used for your CABLE TV tuner(which is not connected to an Aerial but is connected to the street cable) or the Aerial sockets connected to an antenna? In the following I assume you meant the cable TV sockets for you cable TV tuner.

I am in Australia - and use Telstra. I have a co-ax outlet for my cable modem - and four co-ax outlets for my Foxtel TV however they all work for either purpose.

Currently I only use two outlets and there is no difference in speed (I have paid for the speed boost and when I do measure get 115 M download speeds)

At one stage I used one outlet with a splitter - this also worked with no speed loss - I do now have a amplifier fitted to that outlet but it only has the modem connected now.

I don't know that your systems are the same - but I cannot see why the technology would be different.

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Yes, the type of coax used for TV antennas is the same type of coax used for cable TV and DOCSIS: RG-6 or RG-59, both of which have 75Ω characteristic impedance.

So if you disconnect your TV antenna (aerial) in your loft, you can use that existing in-wall coax segment to extend your CATV / DOCSIS signals to your loft, so you can put your DOCSIS modem in your loft. Those few extra meters of cable shouldn't cause any appreciable signal loss, so it should just work. Make sure you don't leave your TV antenna connected though; you don't want to accidentally broadcast CATV signals, and the presence of the antenna would allow RF interference to enter your coax cables.

  • is it same one as used for internet connections? – emte May 26 '18 at 6:33

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