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I am setting a static IP address for my desktop PC and reserving that address on the router so that it only assigns that address to my PC. Is there any advantage or disadvantage to choosing certain IP addresses?

For example, is there any advantage to choosing a lower number such as 192.168.1.2 over a higher number such as 192.168.100.100?

I also have several other devices which I am connecting to the network: a couple other desktop PCs, phones, laptops, etc.

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    Note that your router may work properly only in 192.168.X.* range, where X is set in router and is often 0 or 1 by default. Eg if your router address (default gateway in DHCP) is 192.168.1.1, then address like 192.168.100.200 may not be able to access internet. Addresses like ..*.0, ..*.254 and ..*.255 are best to avoid either. – Arvo Jun 6 '18 at 12:38
  • You should not manually assign numbers that a DHCP-server on your network feels responsible for. Or your router expects to find outside your home. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jun 7 '18 at 8:00
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Technically it makes no difference what IP address your device has.

Usually consumer/home routers will set the DHCP range to be high numbers, ie. 100 to 200 in which case it makes sense to put static IP's outside that range.

I do tend to put things I use often at "easy numbers".

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If you understand subnetting, then either would work. If you don't, then keep that 3rd digit the same throughout the building, so everything is 192.168.1. nnn - or more specifically, whatever the router uses for defaults - some use 192.168.0.x for example. There's no reason, at consumer level, to force any change in that.

Your router's DHCP server will have a 'pool' it selects its assignments from. Sometimes this will be the full range from 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.254

Unless the router automatically removes any static mapping from the remaining pool, then first ensure you can adjust that pool manually, to avoid potential conflict. One way would be to reduce the pool to 192.168.1.20 upwards, then assign your static devices below that.
As Mikael already said, that leaves the 'easy numbers' for your common devices.
No number is any "better" than any other, so just use memorable ones.

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I am setting a static IP address for my desktop PC and reserving that address on the router so that it only assigns that address to my PC.

It's a wrong (but possible) practice, especially when MAC stored in DHCP reservation and real MAC address of that IP differs (can occur in future, by damaged NIC replacing, for example). Additionally any change at DHCP which is transferred to clients (DNS address or static route change, for example) will not be transferred to Your station, You must check for that changes and apply them on Your station "by hands".

The better solution is to use IP address out of DHCP scope range. But the problem with manual change tracking is retained.

The best solution is in use dynamic addressing with static reservation plus the same settings in alternative configuration applied when DHCP is not available. The problem with manual change tracking is retained too (for alternative config only), but not so significant as in previous case.

Is there any advantage or disadvantage to choosing certain IP addresses?

No, if You use IP addresses from "private" subnets (for IPv4 see RFC1918). Any IPv4 address is some 4-byte long value, not more.

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    For a consumer-level question, this is just way too confusing & unlikely to ever actually be a problem. – Tetsujin Jun 6 '18 at 6:52
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    @Tetsujin There is some reason unknown to us why the author uses static addressing. If this information is not clear to him or is not needed he can ignore and don't read it. But if it makes him read and understand what I wrote to him, my main goal will be achieved. – Akina Jun 6 '18 at 6:58
  • @Akina Some parts are a bit confusing to me but there is some good insight. You are saying that the MAC address of my PC can change if I replace my network card, right? I also found the "4-byte long value" info useful. – Jorge Luque Jun 6 '18 at 7:26
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    @JorgeLuque You are saying that the MAC address of my PC can change if I replace my network card, right? Yes, it is. Each NIC is assigned an unique (in the world range!) MAC address by its manufacturer (moreover, in most cases first 6 hex digits of it allows to determine the manufacturer - with some surprise sometimes). Additionally some NIC drivers allows to change (runtime replace, not store) the MAC seen by remote clients in NIC driver's additional properties. And some NICs having their own BIOS (Intel, for example) allows to override the MAC in the NIC properties on hardware level. – Akina Jun 6 '18 at 7:41
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Indeed, keeping the numbering as simple as possible is the way to go. It may seem choosing a lower digit say 192.168.100.4 as compared to 192.168.100.75 may have advantage as far as establishing a connection to gateway is concerned (at least that's what I assumed initially in my setup) but certainly not the case.

Thus you can freely select which IP address to assign to your devices, as either IP address is just treated the same, nomatter higher or lower the value.

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