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As my question before was a bit weird (no definite answer could be given), I try it to formulate my question differently:

When comparing these two options:

30-40 Mbit/s download speed (LTE), but with a wireless router. 
(speedtest said 31 Mbit/s)

20 Mbit/s download speed (DSL), with a wired router (4 GigEthernet Ports)
(ISP says 20Mbit/s)

What shoud be considered when comparing these options? Is the first option (LTE with a wireless router) still better because of those 30-40Mbit/s download?

Credentials are speed and availability for 4-6 users.

I really just want to know how big of an impact the fact is, the LTE/WLAN is a shared medium and half duplex, so if those 30-40Mb/s (LTE, wireless) just seem to be better than those 20Mbit/s (DSL, wired).

EDIT: I want to know if the bandwidth difference between my two options above (which is around 10Mbit/s) is compensated by the fact, that the wireless router in my first option is half duplex and a shared medium and the router in my second option is not.

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  • lte for win....
    – gamer0
    Jun 16, 2018 at 14:11
  • @Tim_Stewart good answer! I just wanted to know if the bandwidth difference between my two options above is compensated by the fact, that the wireless router in my first option is half duplex and a shared medium and the router in my second option is not.
    – watchme
    Jun 16, 2018 at 17:21

1 Answer 1

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If i had to make this choice, this is how i would weigh up my options. The end choice will be your own.

Some things to consider:

  • Am I planning on making a service on my network available to the internet?
  • Do I need to use VOIP or real-time applications on this connection?
  • Am I going to be using this connection for gaming?
  • Do I only need this connection from the home? or will i be on the road?
  • Does the LTE connection have a monthly CAP or usage window?

Average Latency:

  • LTE (seems to be averaging here in the US about 90 ~ 100ms)
  • DSL (googling averages i found 44ms ~ 65ms)

Radio back-hauls can have a lot of varying latency. (jitter) Depending on what you are trying to do with the connection, it can be devastating to the user experience.(VOIP,Skype,Gaming)


Type of NAT:

  • LTE = Carrier Grade NAT (AFAIK you do not get a publicly accessible IP.)
  • DSL = Global IP Address (it is uncommon to not have a public IP.)

If you do not plan on port-forwarding anything, using P2P, or gaming. this aspect wont matter much to you. (If it does matter to you, ask your provider if its possible to get a global IP address.)


Gaming:

  • LTE (depending on how the game connects, server/client vs P2P) it may not even be possible behind this type of NAT
  • DSL Although it doesn't have the best latency compared to other network types.
    It does work out alright for those unfortunate enough to not have a choice.

VOIP

  • LTE probably not going to have a fun time trying to get this working correctly, the provider sells lines on the same tower. :)
  • DSL it is doable with the proper QOS rules and jitter buffers

Full-duplex or not?

  • LTE = Half-duplex, unless its LTE-A.
  • DSL = Depends on the actual type of DSL offered, DSL vs ADSL & VDSL. (Most DSL subscriptions these days are full-duplex AFAIK)

References:
http://www.cablefree.net/wirelesstechnology/4glte/lte-network-latency/
https://www.igvita.com/2012/07/19/latency-the-new-web-performance-bottleneck/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LTE_(telecommunication)#Frequency_bands

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  • 1
    Oh !! I wondered over what you said about the type of NAT used when accessing the internet via LTE, as I thought my router does "normal" NAT (which is connected to the ISP via LTE) But know everything makes sense! Because yesterday I went to "whatsmyip.com" and it showed to me that I am (according to my IP) located in the capital city of my country (which am really not). But with Carrier Grade NAT, this makes sense indeed! Thanks!
    – watchme
    Jun 16, 2018 at 17:25

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