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I have Guardian NetSecure anti-virus installed in my PC.

Task manager shows that a process named Browser SandboxSafe Browsing Security Service(Core Browsing Protection), which seems to be part of the antivirus, is constantly using about 30-35% of CPU when the PC is plugged in and about 15-16% of CPU when on battery power.

Is this continous use of CPU to such extent by an application safe for the PC or it will degrade it on the grounds of providing virus protection ?

PC configuration

Intel i5 7200U @2.5GHz(4 CPUs) ~2.7GHz

8GB RAM

2GB NVIDIA 940MX

WINDOWS 10 HOME 64 BIT

Antivirus

Guardian NetSecure

  • What's your question? – gronostaj Jul 9 '18 at 17:29
  • Made the question italic in the edited version – MSD Jul 9 '18 at 17:32
  • Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. – Ramhound Jul 9 '18 at 20:41
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Hey i had the same problem and figured out a workaround. First open Guardian AV. go to settings > turn self protection off. Only then can you end this process Then open task manager and manually end the Browser Sandbox process. It remains on even when i am not browsing and is a nuisance. It heats up my laptop. If you want you can go to the guardian install folder and manually turn in back on. It is with the name SCSECSVC.exe Hope it helps

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Is this continous use of CPU to such extent by an application safe for the PC?

Yes. PCs are designed to be under constant load. 35% load isn't dangerous for a laptop. A well-cooled laptop can withstand continuous 100% CPU load. If cooling isn't sufficient, prolonged exposure to high temperature will have detrimental effect on battery life.

Is it normal for AV software? No. Your AV is behaving weirdly. I, personally, wouldn't trust it.

... or it will degrade it on the grounds of providing virus protection?

Yes and no. It won't suffer permanent degradation, but it will be noticeably slower - 30% is a significant amount of your computational power that could be used for something else or just avoided to save battery life.

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