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I would like to remotely access - by two different users simultaneously - a powerful workstation running Windows 10 Pro. Normally, only one concurrent remote desktop protocol (RDP) session is allowed under Windows 10. However, I read that one can use Hyper-V to create a Windows 10 virtual machine (VM) on the Windows 10 host, and then the two users can simultaneously RDP into each of the two Windows machines: 1) the original host, and 2) the VM.

So, in Hyper-V I created a new Windows 10 VM and an external VM switch. But I don't know how to use Remote Desktop Connection to remotely access the VM. Does the VM need its own IP address (separate from that of the host)? How do I learn or assign that separate IP address?

Many thanks in advance! Tom

Problem Solved! Answer:

It IS as simple as music2myear suggested. However, because I'm in a tightly buttoned-down University computing environment, network connectivity (and an IP address via our DHCP service) was unavailable until the new VM was properly registered with the University's host database. After that, oddly, the VM was still unable to connect to the internet until I switched from my external virtual switch to the default switch. After demonstrating internet connectivity from the VM, I then switched back to the new external virtual switch, which (finally!) allowed me to access the VM via Remote Desktop Connection (after having first allowing remote connections via System/Properties tab/Remote Desktop). Now two separate users can simultaneously access remotely and use this workstation.

  • of course the VM's network adapter has to have a different IP from the host's adapters. It's easier to use bridge networking since the VM will connect to the same router that the host is using. Using NAT will be trickier since you'll need to use port forwarding and use a different port to access the guest[ – phuclv Jul 31 '18 at 11:16
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The default setup for HyperV should work.

In case you're past this point and need to create something new to make it all work, here's what my setup is, and it works the way you appear to want yours to work:

In HyperV I created a Virtual Switch, VS-External, set to External Network, the physical NIC on the host, with "Allow management OS to share this network adapter" enabled.

Then I connected all my VMs to this VS-External.

On the host, VS-External gets an IP address from whatever provides DHCP on your network, and I can connect to the host via remote desktop using this IP address.

On the VMs, by default they each get their own IPs from the DHCP provider on the physical/host network also, and for all intents and purposes, they exist on that physical LAN and can be accessed the same way by any other resource on the network.

  • His information was helpful - thanks! It IS as simple as you suggest. One problem I had was that, as I'm in a tightly buttoned-down University computing environment, network connectivity (and an IP address via our DHCP service) was unavailable until the new VM was properly registered with the University's host database. After that, oddly, I was still unable to connect to the internet until I switched from my external virtual switch to the default switch. After demonstrating connectivity, I then switched back to the new external virtual switch. – Tom Kreutz Aug 2 '18 at 14:03
  • It sounds as though the issue was probably DNS and settings specific to your University's network environment. If my post answered your question, you can indicate that by clicking the checkmark icon next to it. – music2myear Aug 2 '18 at 15:18

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