My motherboard has three separate SATA controllers each in their own IOMMU group. Two ASMedia controllers and the one in the Intel PCH.

I want to make sure my main drives are using the Intel controller.

How can I see which SATA controllers are being used and for which drives?

Looking for GNU/Linux commands that display text info.

EDIT: Here's my lshw -class storage -class disk output:

*-storage                 
    description: SATA controller
    product: ASM1062 Serial ATA Controller
    vendor: ASMedia Technology Inc.
*-storage
    description: SATA controller
    product: ASM1062 Serial ATA Controller
    vendor: ASMedia Technology Inc.
*-storage
    description: SATA controller
    product: 9 Series Chipset Family SATA Controller [AHCI Mode]
    vendor: Intel Corporation
*-scsi:0
    physical id: 1
    logical name: scsi2
    capabilities: emulated
  *-disk
       description: ATA Disk
       bus info: scsi@2:0.0.0
*-scsi:1
    physical id: 2
    logical name: scsi3
    capabilities: emulated
  *-disk
       description: ATA Disk
       bus info: scsi@3:0.0.0
*-scsi:2
    physical id: 3
    logical name: scsi4
    capabilities: emulated
  *-disk
       description: ATA Disk
       bus info: scsi@4:0.0.0
  • The motherboard manual will indicate which ports on the board belong to which controller – Ramhound Aug 26 at 0:59
  • That's fine but I'm really looking for some commands like lspci and lsusb – vaps Aug 26 at 1:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The device hierarchy is available in /sys, if you don't want to do it manually, you can use udevadm:

$ udevadm info -q path -n /dev/sda
/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1f.2/ata1/host0/target0:0:0/0:0:0:0/block/sda

So on my system, /dev/sda is SCSI unit 0:0:0:0, and the SATA controller has PCI id 0000:00:1f.2, which is the Intel PCH controller:

$ lspci
00:1f.2 SATA controller: Intel Corporation 6 Series/C200 Series Chipset Family SATA AHCI Controller (rev 05)
  • Awesome! This is perfect. I would upvote you but I don't have 15 rep. – vaps Aug 26 at 12:39

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