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I am trying to access my Windows laptop from my Mac. I am using Filezilla and FTP/SFTP. I am not sure if Filezilla only works with remote servers. Right now I am using the username, password, public IP address, and port 22 with Filezilla, but it is failing. Should I use the private IP address since I am on the same network (i.e 192.168.1.5)?

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    The IP to use it the server's IP (and it needs to have some FTP server software running, of course). SFTP is safer than plain old FTP, Forklift supports it, so there's no reason not to use it. – user931000 Aug 30 '18 at 1:00
  • But this is a Windows Laptop. Will it still work with that? And do I need to specify ports? – Cody Rutscher Aug 30 '18 at 1:01
  • FTP/SFTP are "protocols", independent from OSes and any "FTP client" should work, from any OS. Yes, usually you need to specify a port. The question is: Have you already set up the server (in Windows)? That is the starting point, not the client. – user931000 Aug 30 '18 at 1:09
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    Yes, that's your goal, isn't it? Look, I'm starting to feel you don't even know what you want let alone how to accomplish it. Is it FTP/SFTP right for you? I don't know, maybe this is an X-Y problem. What is the purpose of connecting the two machines or, in other words, what exactly do you want to do? – user931000 Aug 30 '18 at 1:28
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    If the two machines are on the same local network, the built-in network file sharing is likely the best way to do this. makeuseof.com/tag/easily-share-files-windows-7-8-mac-os-x – Moshe Katz Aug 30 '18 at 4:01
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To connect to windows from another computer (e.g., your mac), then windows has to be running some type of server -- for remote file copy, that would be (insecure) ftp or (secure) sftp/scp. The latter is recommended, and is implemented via an OpenSSH server that would have to be installed on Windows, and then a use a remote sftp/scp client from the other computer: such as WinSCP (windows) or command-line sftp/scp (mac/linux, or windows via cygwin/etc), or a gui like CyberDuck for mac, etc.

Windows used to require installation of the OpenSSH server via Cygwin (e.g., Swan (http://www.starlig.ht/)), but now Windows (depending on your version) may include an OpenSSH server already, see one of these how-to's to see if it works for you (sorry, I can't verify which steps will work for you, as it depends on what MS is currently releasing & what version you have -- fwiw, I always install cygwin (via swan) & just use that, but I'm a linux user & that works best for me):

If those steps become out of date or don't work for getting the sshd server installed for you (so your ssh client (sftp/scp) can connect), then the google search terms you're looking for is "how to install openssh server on windows".

Update: It should have been noted earlier that Mac OS comes with an ssh server by default, but it's just not running by default. Since with sftp/scp you can both get & put files, you could also just enable the sshd (stands for ssh daemon, aka ssh server) server on Mac, and then use your Windows PC via WinSCP to copy files back & forth between the two computers.

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    Is this along the right lines?winscp.net/eng/docs/guide_windows_openssh_server – Cody Rutscher Sep 10 '18 at 7:13
  • yes, that's the same link which is included above -- give it a shot? ymmv – michael Sep 10 '18 at 11:06
  • So does OpenSSH basically turn the Windows machine into a "server"? Also, do you mind upvoting my question. I am trying to get my account reinstated. – Cody Rutscher Sep 10 '18 at 11:11
  • The term "server" is overloaded. (Ignore that some computers are called "servers" for a moment.) Most communication between two programs on the internet is (1) initiated by one program, and then (2) the work is done by a second program (which returns the result to the first). The program initiating the request is the "client", and the program completing the work is the "server". Also, every client & server need to speak a common language, or "protocol". E.g., your browser is an http "client" that talks to an http "server". In this case, the protocol is sftp/scp; windows runs the server. – michael Sep 11 '18 at 3:41
  • It should have been noted earlier that mac comes with an ssh server by default, but it's just not running by default. Since with sftp/scp you can both get & put files, you could also just enable the sshd (stands for ssh daemon, aka ssh server) server on Mac, and then use your Windows PC via WinSCP to copy files back & forth between the two computers. (I'll add this to the answer.) Then the role of client & server are reversed, but the result is the same. – michael Sep 11 '18 at 3:43

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