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In order to know how to focus a floating panel, it is essential to know the window manager the programmers use. In case they don't reply back, what can I do to identify the manager so that I can modify the program myself?

closed as too broad by harrymc, Ramhound, DavidPostill Sep 18 '18 at 17:46

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  • You are not going to be able to modify how a specific panel works in a program. – Ramhound Sep 18 '18 at 14:59
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    When a program is written it starts as source code. That source code gets compiled to make an EXE. The EXE in itself can not be modified, it is a locked file. The only way to modify a program is to change the source code, recompile, and make a new EXE. For this reason, since you do not have the source code, you can't modify the program you mention – Eric F Sep 18 '18 at 15:10
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Developers have several options when writing a program that has a User Interface (UI):

If the program is targeted for a specific OS they can choose to use the officially-published OS Developers Kit (dev kit) which will allow the program to use elements provided by and supported by the developer of the OS. Microsoft offers these for programs written for Windows. Programs written using the default elements will generally behave most like OS native programs and will be least affected by patches and future upgrades to the OS.

If the program will be cross platform the developer may choose to use a Framework. These are written by third parties who handle the necessary connections for running on whichever OSes are being targeted by the framework. Java is an example of one such framework. Mono is another cross-platform framework which is heavily based on Microsoft's own .Net framework. These frameworks provide what are essentially plugins that developers can use that provide abilities, services, and options the program may need, allowing the programmer to assemble a program like building blocks, or at least elements of the programs such as the UI, in order to speed development and leave more time to focusing on the heart of the program.

Another option is to write your own program entirely. When done this way the developer must take all aspects of the program into consideration and write the UI, the options, the inner logic, everything. In some cases this method has resulted in programs that last a long time and work really, really well (the early Roller Coaster Tycoon games are perhaps the best known example of this done very well). But this method also requires the most effort and so isn't super common, and when done wrong can result in programs that require constant maintenance to keep them working correctly as patches and different OS versions substantially change how things work. This can also result in programs behaving in ways that are counter-intuitive or very awkward relative to "standard conventions".

To more directly answer your question though: If the program is open source you can inspect the code yourself. There may be tags indicating the frameworks used. Or it may become clear the developer built the entire thing themselves. If the program is closed source you would have to ask the developer, and it is up to them whether or not they choose to answer.

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