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Here is my Powercfg /a response:

C:\Windows\System32>powercfg /a
The following sleep states are available on this system:
    Standby (S0 Low Power Idle) Network Connected
    Fast Startup

The following sleep states are not available on this system:

Standby (S1)
    The system firmware does not support this standby state.
    This standby state is disabled when S0 low power idle is supported.

Standby (S2)
    The system firmware does not support this standby state.
    This standby state is disabled when S0 low power idle is supported.

Standby (S3)
    The system firmware does not support this standby state.
    This standby state is disabled when S0 low power idle is supported.

Hibernate
    The hiberfile type does not support hibernation.

Hybrid Sleep
    Standby (S3) is not available.
    Hibernation is not available.
    The hypervisor does not support this standby state.

I have tried all manners that I know of to enable Hibernate: using GPedit, Regedit, Powercfg /h on, and none of these options will turn on Hibernate. Apparently after 4 hours of Sleep (Modern Standby) my computer should go into Hibernation automatically but it doesn't, after 19 hours in sleep I lost 93% battery and could not turn on the computer because the battery is dead.

2

Windows 10 supports two forms of hibernation file: full and reduced. If the latter is in use hibernation cannot be enabled - this is what powercfg /a is reporting when it says The hiberfile type does not support hibernation. See https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/desktop/power/system-power-states#hibernation-file-types for more details from MS's online documentation, and run powercfg /? hibernate to get the (smaller) built-in documentation from powercfg.

You can change the hibernate file type to full with POWERCFG /HIBERNATE /TYPE FULL.

A "full" hibernate file is something MS officially recommended you do not enable on devices with a small system volume. This includes both devices with small storage overall, such as many tablets and some laptops, and those with larger storage overall but still a small system volume, either through having multipe drives or larger drive being partitioned that way. When installed on these devices Windows will default to a reduced hibernate file. If set to "reduced" either manually or by installation default, it will not switch to full if the device is upgraded (i.e. if you migrate Windows to a larger drive instead of reinstalling when you upgrade) so in those instances you need to run POWERCFG /HIBERNATE /TYPE FULL manually.

Once you have changed the file type, you may still need to enable hibernation using the setting deep in the power options: start / settings / system / power & sleep / additional power settings / choose what closing the lid does / change settings that are currently unavailable (this may ask you to give permission for elevation) / then you can finally check the hibernate box.

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  • “A "full" hibernate file is officially recommended against for devices with a small system volume.“ - Are you trying to say that Microsoft recommends against use a full hibernation file on low storage devices? – Ramhound Nov 9 '18 at 5:05
  • @Ramhound - yes. Also if you have a small system drive (usually C:) despite having larger storage available in total such as when a device has been upgraded by adding a second drive but the new space used as a second filesystem instead of the system volume being expanded our migrated. I think 64GB counts as "small" in this regard these days as you'll struggle to even install the latest Win10 updates on a 32GB-only device. – David Spillett Nov 9 '18 at 10:05
  • You might want to edit that statement since it’s grammatical confusing – Ramhound Nov 9 '18 at 11:44
  • @Ramhound - feel free to edit if you can improve the wording. – David Spillett Nov 10 '18 at 1:15
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I have tried all manners that I know of to enable Hibernate

Microsoft support has posted a help article with instructions to fix this issue:

By default, hibernation is not preconfigured in Windows 10. The user must manually configure hibernation and sleep behavior.

Resolution

To configure the device so that it hibernates after a certain period, follow these steps:

  • Click the Windows icon.
  • Type Power Options.
  • Select the Power Options control panel.
  • Choose your current power plan.
  • Click Change plan settings.
  • Click Change advanced power settings.
  • Click Sleep.
  • Click Hibernate After.
  • Set the time period after which to hibernate.

Source Surface Pro 3 or Surface 3 doesn't hibernate in Windows 10

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