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A am curious if i can setup a network with the following topology:

home network

R1 - 192.168.0.1 R2 - 192.168.0.2 R3 - 192.168.0.3

How a network like this can be done?

  • As written, the question is very ambiguous. An IP address is associated with an Interface, not a device - thus (Internet/up) routers have more then 1 address. What are you trying to achieve? It is a very bad idea for the LAN interfaces in each of your routers to have the proposed IPs, and if not impossible, it is , at least, complex, unreliable and an all round bad idea. If, on the other hand you want router 1 LAN and router 2 and 3 wan on those IPs, while using different subnets for the other I terraces, that's quite doable. – davidgo Nov 28 '18 at 8:56
  • What i want is todo, is to extend the network for multiple devices. "If, on the other hand you want router 1 LAN and router 2 and 3 wan on those IPs, while using different subnets for the other I terraces, that's quite doable" seems what i want to do. How should i setup the routers to do this? – Madalin Nov 28 '18 at 13:43
  • Why do you need 3 routers? Why not 1 router and 2 AP's? This would be a much easier network to maintain/use. Also, (why) do you need those specifuc IOs on the routers? – davidgo Nov 28 '18 at 17:41
  • well, that will do it also i guess at least if i can use the ports from the last 2 one. how can that be achieved? i don't need specific ip's - it was just how i thought i can do it. – Madalin Nov 28 '18 at 22:25
  • To turn routers into APs you simply disable DHCP on them. You would also want to give them a static IP address on the LAN interface in the same subnet but outside t DHCP pool (probably 192.168.0.x will work) The LAN ports will continue to work as normal, but you won't use the WAN port). Another advantage of this setup is seem lless roaming between if each AP and router have the same SSID and password (but different channels) – davidgo Nov 29 '18 at 5:27
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Yes. Leave Router 1 doing NAT and acting as a DHCP server, but configure Router 2 and Router 3 to disable their NAT gateway and DHCP Server services. Give them static IP addresses on the 192.168.0.0/24 network, or let them use their DHCP client code to receiver their own DHCP lease from Router 1 if you want.

Note that some cheap routers don't let you disable NAT, so you just have to stop using their WAN port. Connect one of their LAN ports to the switch.

Also note that some cheap routers don't let you disable their DHCP Server service, so you may have to configure their DHCP Server address lease pool to be zero length, so they have no addresses to serve out.

  • Blindly following this answer is a bad idea as it blurs routing and switching / ignores subnetting routing issues. It's probably prudent to work out the purpose of the proposed design and then tackle it correctly. – davidgo Nov 28 '18 at 17:53

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