I find conflcting information on this subject. Are they the same thing? I've read that Jabber is "based" on XMPP.

For example: The chat client "Pidgin" has a box for XMPP but seemingly not for Jabber. Yet, it seems to support it.

What's the difference between XMPP and Jabber?

up vote 18 down vote accepted

From http://wiki.xmpp.org/web/Jabber_Programmer%27s_Guide

The architecture of the Jabber network is similar to email while a Jabber server conforms an email server (server.com) and Jabber clients conforms email clients (user@server.com). The difference is that everything happens (by definition: nearly) in realtime over a persistent XML-TCP stream. In example this makes it possible that other (authorized) users can see your online presence. In addition to that servers can offer specialised services, in example a user directory (users.server.com) or a weather agent (weather.server.com). XMPP is the architecture/protocol the network is based on.

And specifically:

What is the difference between Jabber and XMPP? Since 2004 XMPP is the IETF-approved instant messaging and presence protocol. XMPP is based on the Jabber protocol that evolves since 1998. Basically programming Jabber software today means programming XMPP compliant software.

  • 2
    This answer is wrong. How did it get 18 upvotes? See the next answer. – Pacerier Nov 20 '14 at 12:09
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    Yep, it's wrong because Jabber is not the name of an implementation. – Flow Nov 20 '14 at 16:11
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    I've updated the answer. – jtimberman Dec 10 '14 at 20:02
  • Am I reading this wrong? The first blurb says "XMPP is the architecture/protocol the [Jabber] network is based on." The second one says "XMPP is based on the Jabber protocol." A bit of a chicken and egg problem here, no? – speedplane Jul 15 '16 at 1:03

XMPP is the new name, Jabber the old. So yes, they refer to the same protocol stack.

XMPP is used as name since 2002:

In late 2001 and early 2002, prominent members of the Jabber community decided to once again submit the base Jabber protocols to the IETF, this time as an official submission by the JSF. The first submission was made in February 2002 as an informational Internet-Draft (text | HTML). Following on the success of this submission, it was decided to explore the possibility of forming an IETF Working Group devoted to formalization of the base Jabber protocols, under the neutral name of Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP).

Maybe some background: The name/term 'Jabber' was bought by Cisco and is now a registered trademark of Cisco.

What is the difference between Jabber and XMPP?

Since 2004 XMPP is the IETF-approved instant messaging and presence protocol. XMPP is based on the Jabber protocol that evolves since 1998. Basically programming Jabber software today means programming XMPP compliant software.

According to : http://wiki.xmpp.org/web/Jabber_Programmer's_Guide

It looks like as an improved version of Jabber protocol.

Note that "Jabber" is a registered trademark (JABBER®):

http://xmpp.org/about-xmpp/xsf/jabber-trademark/

JABBER® is a registered trademark licensed through the XMPP Standards Foundation.

Jabber and XMPP

We use the terms Jabber and XMPP interchangeably. These technologies were originally developed by Jeremie Miller and the Jabber open source community in 1998–1999. When the community submitted its core protocols to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) in 2002, it chose the name EXtensible Messaging and Presence Protocol” to distinguish the protocol from the broader technology and developer community. You can think of the relationship as XMPP is to Jabber as HTTP is to the Web The term Jabber was proactively trademarked by Jabber, Inc. (now part of Cisco Systems, Inc.) in 2000 to protect the open source community, but the XSF sublicenses the term for use in open source projects and other community activities.

What about this, a well written back in 2006 Jabber vs. XMPP

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