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Today I was copying a node.js folder to another place on the file system, and I was wondering.. with SSD and write behind caching, why is the copy many files problem not purely a case of "figure out all the changes in memory and then commit the bytes to disk"?

I know there are many steps to copying a file including making space for it, transferring the bytes, adding directory entries etc, but in terms of storage performance it should at least theoretically be possible to perform much of that work upfront, instead of one by one synchronously in the file system.

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    Do you have write behind enabled? It is not enabled by default, because it can cause data loss (in case of crash, power loss, etc). – David Balažic Mar 4 '20 at 10:40
  • Interesting that it is off by default in win10, didn't know that! – user230910 Mar 6 '20 at 0:36
  • to be clear: there are two levels of write caching in Windows. First one is enabled by default, the second is not. See the settings in Device Manager for each HDD/SSD. – David Balažic Mar 9 '20 at 9:00
  • Please can you add this as an answer, it seems to be the missing piece to my understanding – user230910 Mar 9 '20 at 22:59
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There are two levels of write caching in Windows. First one is enabled by default, the second is not. See the settings in Device Manager for each HDD/SSD.

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