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a couple of days ago I opened my PC but I saw something in boot screen just like;

Failed to start Remount Root and Kernel File Systems.

After status systemd-remount-fs.service command;

   ● systemd-remount-fs.service - Remount Root and Kernel File Systems
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/systemd-remount-fs.service; enabled-runtime; vendor preset: disabled)
   Active: failed (Result: exit-code) since Thu 2019-05-16 07:22:48 +00; 3min 38s ago
     Docs: man:systemd-remount-fs.service(8)
           https://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/APIFileSystems
  Process: 742 ExecStart=/usr/lib/systemd/systemd-remount-fs (code=exited, status=1/FAILURE)
 Main PID: 742 (code=exited, status=1/FAILURE)

May 16 07:22:47 manjaro systemd[1]: Starting Remount Root and Kernel File Systems...
May 16 07:22:48 manjaro systemd-remount-fs[742]: mount: /: can't find UUID=F982-A556.
May 16 07:22:48 manjaro systemd-remount-fs[742]: /usr/bin/mount for / exited with exit status 1.
May 16 07:22:48 manjaro systemd[1]: systemd-remount-fs.service: Main process exited, code=exited, status=1/FAILURE
May 16 07:22:48 manjaro systemd[1]: systemd-remount-fs.service: Failed with result 'exit-code'.
May 16 07:22:48 manjaro systemd[1]: Failed to start Remount Root and Kernel File Systems.

Can you help? Thanks for your attention by the way.

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Your /etc/fstab file has the filesystem entries mixed-up. You have something like:

UUID=F982-A556    /    [...]

The first problem is that a filesystem with that UUID outright doesn't exist on your system. The second problem is that such unusual UUID format only ever comes from FAT16/FAT32 filesystems, so even if it existed, it would be completely unsuitable for acting as the / (root) filesystem. Perhaps it's an old entry that was supposed to actually be at /boot or /efi (where FAT would make sense), or perhaps the Manjaro installer accidentally picked up your USB stick when it was searching for the root partition.

In any case, it should be safe to delete this fstab entry completely – the boot process does not rely on it being present. (The root partition is found according to the kernel command line.)

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