9

Is there an nmap line that will auto-detect my current IP address and subnet mask, and run a ping-scan on all? For example:

#> nmap -sP 0.0.0.0

Instead of manually:

#> nmap -sP 192.168.100.0/24
6

I don't think that there is a way with doing that with nmap alone, but you could script it: Here is a quick and dirty solution:

#!/bin/bash

IP_AND_MASK=`ifconfig | grep "inet addr" | head -n1 | sed 's|.*addr:\([0-9\.]*\).*Mask:\([0-9\.]*\)|\1/\2|g'`
NETWORK=`ipcalc "$IP_AND_MASK" | grep "Network:" | sed 's|^Network:\s*\([0-9/\.]*\).*|\1|g'`
nmap -sP "$NETWORK"

You have to install ipcalc to make that solution work.

hth

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1

Mileage may vary, but this should work well in most circumstances...

nmap -sP `hostname -I | sed 's/[0-9]\+\s/0\/24 /g'`
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  • It will work if my subnet is /24 which for most homes it, but for some corporate environment isn't. Good tip though! I like it. – Felipe Alvarez Aug 18 '18 at 11:19
-1

This works, but then you still need to know your own subnet... saves copy-pasting the IP address though.

nmap -sP /24
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  • On my system (OS X 10.10, nmap version 6.47) this doesn’t work for me. I get the following error: ::1/0 looks like an IPv6 target specification -- you have to use the -6 option.. – Daniel Griscom Jan 25 '15 at 21:13
  • 1
    Does not work on ubuntu 18.04. Need to specify the network ID address – pcnate Jun 7 '18 at 17:58
  • try: nmap -sP 10.0.0.0/24 or maybe nmap -sP 192.168.0.0/24 works on macOS also – Tomachi Oct 22 '19 at 11:13

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