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This is slightly unethical, but I would still ask.

I have a mobile data plan which allows me to play some online games for free (i.e. the data used by connections to servers of the games specified doesn't count toward my data limit). Is there a way to forge, spoof, or otherwise pretend that all my traffic is going to those servers? It wouldn't be hard to find the IPs that are considered "free". Does the protocols allow servers to redirect "wrongly" sent packets to the correct recipient?

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In short, usually no. Without some prior arrangement, those servers won't have any mechanism that would let you relay arbitrary IP data through them.

Is there a way to forge, spoof, or otherwise pretend that all my traffic is going to those servers?

No. What you're asking is to make your ISP think the packet is for destination A, but the rest of the internet think it's for destination B... but the packet has only one 'destination' field and you can't put both addresses in there.

Once the packet leaves your network, you are no longer in control of it; you cannot magically reroute it mid-flight – if it had a "free server" listed as its destination in the beginning, it'll always have the same destination through its entire trip, and it will go to that server, not anywhere else.

(IP packets can have various "source routing" and "segment routing" headers, but those do not work on the public Internet – they'll be either ignored or cause the whole packet to be discarded.)

Besides, your outgoing traffic is usually a very small part of the total – the majority of your non-game data is inbound. So it's not just you that would need to spoof their destination; all servers you're communicating with would also need to spoof the source of their response packets to make them look like they came from a "free" server.

Does the protocols allow servers to redirect "wrongly" sent packets to the correct recipient?

Also no. Either the packet has that server's address as destination, or it does not – there's no such thing as "wrongly" sent packets, at least not in the way you're imagining. If the packet has the server's address, then the server is the correct recipient, otherwise it wouldn't have received the packet in the first place.

It is possible to put IP packets inside IP packets, with the outer packet having a "free server" as destination, and the inner packet being the one you actually want. That's an IP-IP tunnel and it is the simplest form of a VPN protocol. However, the outer recipient must be configured to expect this – if you send nested packets to any random server without prior arrangement, they'll be ignored.

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No. Assuming they are tracking the IP addresses you are sending traffic t, which is by far the easiest way to implement this: it's not possible unless you can convince the operator of one of the free servers to set-up a proxy or VPN for your use.

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