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I have Windows 10 Home Edition.

About network advanced settings to configure a network I can observe the following:

enter image description here

Until here and according with my understanding (correct me if I am wrong)

  • Private: is about a LAN (home network), all the machines perhaps having some IP between 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.254, the IPs are provided by the router. And with this approach is possible share data through the machines because they are in the same network. It does not matter is through Ethernet or Wifi

For this reason I use:

enter image description here

  • Guest or Public: it should be used if I need access through some machine outside of the LAN, I am outside of my house, it with the purpose to read or write something. Of course the internal machine must be in execution and is possible that the router should be configured to accomplish port forward.

Because I only want share data through the LAN (No external access outside of the network to read and write data to a specific directory) I have the following:

enter image description here

The reason of this post and confusion is the third option All Networks.

Is it an approach to complement the configuration to either of the private or public? Or is a third kind of network? (something special available only for Windows). I am assuming is the former

Currently I have the following:

enter image description here

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Network profiles are not related to either of the two things you mentioned. These are simply arbitrary profiles assigned to the network you are currently connected to. Windows will remember your response, but you are usually prompted when you connect to a new network (think of a mobile laptop) if you want your device to be discoverable on the network, usually with a further explanation to answer “No,” on a “public” network.

The choice of network profile you assign to a network you are connected to (either via wire or wireless) is yours and it basically controls what firewall options are in affect. If you trust the network and want to share data then allowing your computer to be discoverable, when prompted, is the logical choice. The opposite is true on a public network, such as at your local Starbucks.

With that said, the heart of your question is what about “All networks?” It is simply that, it contains settings that apply to BOTH Private and Public network profiles. There is a third profile on domain joined computers called, unsurprisingly, “Domain.”

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Microsoft has made it a bit confusing. Use the settings in Private Networks (correct as shown). Do not use Guest Network (correct as shown). Then for All Networks, use as you have set (Passwords on and 128 bit encryption). Those are good settings

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