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I am setting my home server as a website server. I am struggling to make it work. I have bought a domain and set it up correctly, but I can't reach my server. Below you have my network distribution. I'm afraid I might not be able to make it work due to the ISP router.

My network distribution diagram

My network distribution diagram

If I put the domain I bought into my browser it takes me to the ISP router setup, so that bit is correct. I am not sure then how to make it take me to my router. I tried port forwarding from the ISP Router to my third-party router (TPR) but I still get sent to my ISP router setup. I was expecting to see the TPR setup page.

What do I need to do to route it correctly? In case I change the web server port to something different, would I have to do something else?

  • Your ISP-provided router most likely does not support hairpin NAT. If that’s the case, there is nothing you can do. – Daniel B Dec 27 '19 at 13:01
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Hairpinning

As mentioned out in the comments, hairpinning (NAT Loopback) support on your router(s) could be an issue:

Hairpinning is where a machine on the LAN is able to access another machine on the LAN via the external IP address of the LAN/router (with port forwarding set up on the router to direct requests to the appropriate machine on the LAN).

The quickest way to test for this issue is to use a network that isn't local to access your domain. For instance, connect your smartphone to your carrier network (not WiFi) and see if you can use the mobile browser to successfully access your the web server via your domain. If you can, then the problem you are encountering locally is likely a hairpinning issue.

If hairpinning is the issue, then you could (potentially) run a local DNS server (such as e.g. BIND) on your network to solve this, or even possibly buy a new router.

Other Troubleshooting

I tried port forwarding from the ISP Router to my third-party router (TPR) but I still get sent to my ISP router setup.

To confirm, the setup should likely be:

  • Forward port 80 from your ISP to your third-party router.

  • Forward port 80 from your third-party router to your web server.

Also, assuming your diagram is accurate, it might be worth considering ensuring your devices are all on the same network (192.168.1.x and 192.168.0.x are different networks with a default subnet mask of 255.255.255.0).

In case I change the web server port to something different, would I have to do something else?

You probably won't know until you give it a try. But I would say that changing the port is would be another thing to test. Of course, if you do this, make certain the web server, any port forwarding and any firewall rules are set correctly to allow the connection.

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