0

I've been getting errors now and then with my ADATA HD330 2TB disk (ST2000LM007-1R8174), e.g. in some directories:

enter image description here

Also, the LED sometimes blinks red while also blinking blue, which is a bit strange:

enter image description here

, since this is not described in the datasheet, see below; pure red should mean "shock" (well, the disk is stationary on the table), but this blinked red AND blue.

enter image description here

So, how do I find if the error(s) is physical (hardware) or not?

I need to know if it's case to apply the warranty claim. It could be just a filesystem error (I noticed that the USB cable had bad contact, so I changed it, so the errors might originate due to that), or it could be physical disk error. I don't want to just repair the filesystem without knowing if it's physical error i.e. the case for applying warranty.

I tried to use Crystal Disk Info (see below), but I am not any wiser after seeing this:

enter image description here

EDIT: chkdsk output (unfortunatelly, in Czech, do you know how to make it speak English? It says "Removing damaged record attribute (160, $I30) from segment 200646 of the file record" etc. and finally "There were errors. Program CHKDSK can't continue in read-only mode."

enter image description here

1

Run CHKDSK without any Fix parameter (/F) on the affected drive. If if reports numerous errors, make a screen print and return the drive under warranty

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks John, but this is just a filesystem check, isn't it? How do I recognize from the CHKDSK output what is physical disk error and what is a filesystem error? – Tomas Dec 27 '19 at 14:22
  • CHKDSK also checks the drive for physical errors. Get a screen shot, edit your question and post a screen shot of the errors – John Dec 27 '19 at 14:24
  • Thanks John. It's a bit tricky since the chkdsk output was unfortunatelly localized into my national language, do you know - is there a way to switch it's output to English? – Tomas Dec 27 '19 at 14:25
  • I cannot help with translation. Maybe some one else can or Google to translate it for you. – John Dec 27 '19 at 14:27
  • Done. Please check the updated answer :-) – Tomas Dec 27 '19 at 14:33
1

The S.M.A.R.T. data does not show any of the classical indicators of physical drive failure. (Reallocated/pending sectors, uncorrectable errors, all look good. Read error rate looks maybe not so good but some number is expected and if they're low enough to be correctable they seem to be within expected ranges - they are above threshold.)

Your next step should be to run a S.M.A.R.T. self-test. On Windows, this can be done with gsmartctl. The short test can be run directly. If you wish to run the long test, you might need to set up a scripted looping file access to prevent the disk from going to sleep.

It's also possible that this is a USB <=> SATA controller board failure. Unfortunately, there is no easy way to diagnose such an error, but you might try and see if you can cause it to happen with a long-running drive benchmark, e.g. using HD Tune. Those are largely filesystem-agnostic.

| improve this answer | |
0

As I had a similar case recently, my recommendation is this: Try to backup as much as possible to a new disk and recycle your disk. While copying away files, you'll see how fast or slow it is: If there are just logical errors (filesystem), the copy will be fast. However if there are physical problems, copying will be slow (up to a value that it won't succeed after a year). If you want to send in the disk for warranty ever, you'll have to backup your data anyway (before deleting it on the bad disk).

Reasoning: I think your disk got a "shock" while writing. You have a high "seek error rate" and "read error rate" (if the raw values are correct). Maybe try smartmontools instead.

Also the bad cable could have caused logical consistency errors on the filesystem (that chkdsk should be able to fix unless the disk has a write cache)

| improve this answer | |
0

I need to know if it's case to apply the warranty claim.

To determine this you have to read all sectors to uncover unreadable ones.

Runnning checkdisk with the /F and /R parameters could help.

Running ddrescue by copying to the null device would list you all the locations of unreadables sectors in the logfile. Furthermore each unreadable sector would increase the pending sector count in the SMART parameters.

Keep in mind that abusive handling of the drive will cause errors as well and you have no means of proof if your dealer pretends that possible errors have been caused by your handling.

Other errors are possible as well but you would need to backup your drive before putting a heavy load with a tool like Iometer on it.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.