1

I am trying to setup a Hama IR320 system. However my Wifi (WPA2) password contains ^ and ~ symbols. I cannot find them anywhere in the predefined list of characters:

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or

enter image description here

Is there an alternate way to define Wifi password (other than this UI), or am I missing something here ? I can see there is a http server running on this radio.

For reference manual is at:

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Turns out the list of characters has three funky entries:

enter image description here

After multiple trial and error attemps, I was able to find the matching symbols:

This one is the ~:

enter image description here

And this one is the ^:

enter image description here

The first one (red circle) is the plain dash symbol -.

For reference, the above was done on the following sofware version (ir-mmi-FS2026-0500-0104_V2.6.20.EX63089-1B11):

enter image description here


Here is a possible confirmation for the above interpretation. One can download the firmware directly from here (follow the download link) using known firmwares:

$ GET "http://update.wifiradiofrontier.com/FindUpdate.aspx?mac=1122334455&customisation=ir-mmi-FS2026-0500-0104&version=2.6.17.EX55921-1B3"
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<updates>
  <software customisation="ir-mmi-FS2026-0500-0104"
            version="2.6.20.EX63089-1B11">
    <copyright>Copyright 2007,2008 Frontier Silicon Ltd</copyright>
    <download>http://update.wifiradiofrontier.com/Update.aspx?c=ir-mmi-FS2026-0500-0104&amp;m=1122334455&amp;v=2.6.17.EX55921-1B3&amp;t=Cust-File&amp;n=2.6.20.EX63089-1B11&amp;f=/updates/ir-mmi-FS2026-0500-0104.2.6.20.EX63089-1B11.isu.bin</download>
    <md5>53e79da867eb02f1a4a47c3f831c5226</md5>
    <product>Internet Radio</product>
    <size>1826722</size>
    <summary>Copyright 2007,2008,2009 Frontier Silicon Ltd</summary>
    <vendor>Frontier Silicon</vendor>
  </software>
</updates>

Which then gives:

$ hexdump -C -n 128 -s 0x102E1E ir-mmi-FS2026-0500-0104.2.6.20.EX63089-1B11.isu.bin 
00102e1e  41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48  49 4a 4b 4c 4d 4e 4f 50  |ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP|
00102e2e  51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58  59 5a 22 ed 42 63 11 0c  |QRSTUVWXYZ".Bc..|
00102e3e  d4 00 02 67 68 69 6a 6b  6c 6d 6e 6f 70 71 72 73  |...ghijklmnopqrs|
00102e4e  74 75 76 77 78 79 7a 4c  10 00 03 31 32 33 34 35  |tuvwxyzL...12345|
00102e5e  36 37 38 39 00 00 2e 2c  22 3f 21 40 27 60 5c 7e  |6789...,"?!@'`\~|
00102e6e  2a 5c 00 a4 0b 6c 11 7e  68 2e 5f bd 51 2c 50 01  |*\...l.~h._.Q,P.|
00102e7e  54 05 70 05 00 03 2b 2a  23 24 a3 25 26 28 29 2f  |T.p...+*#$.%&()/|
00102e8e  3a 3b 3c 3d 3e 5b 5d 5e  7b 7d 7c 9d 05 20 45 71  |:;<=>[]^{}|.. Eq|
00102e9e

We are able to find back the symbols ~ and ^ in the right order and expected location (direct neighboors).

One fun deduction is that the following glyph:

enter image description here

is actually the * character (someone to verify?).

There seems to be something odd about the symbole £, which does not display nicely in the hexdump output, maybe this one is not what it looks like (someone to verify ?).

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