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I would like to remove the SSD from my old computer and install it in my new computer for use as extra file storage. Potential issue: the SSD contains the Windows 7 OS, and the new computer’s system is Windows 10 Pro. I was not able to delete, remove or format the Windows 7 files when it was in the old computer. Questions (1) will the mere installation of the SSD, with all its Windows 7 files, somehow inadvertently corrupt the OS in the new computer? (2) assuming the answer to the first question is “no,” what is the best way to remove all the files in the SSD after installation in the new computer and thus have a clean SSD available for extra storage?

The computer is a Dell 8930.

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    What exactly is PCL in the context of your question? – Ramhound Feb 21 '20 at 20:49
  • PCL is just a fact in case it may be useful for someone responding to my question. I have no idea if it is useful. It says, to me, the SSD is not on the motherboard. – Ron McC Feb 23 '20 at 4:34
  • PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) – Ron McC Feb 24 '20 at 14:36
  • I mistakenly confused the last letter in PCI as an "L" It should be an "I" – Ron McC Feb 27 '20 at 18:01
  • You should edit your question to correct that mistake, even if you already have an answer, because if I was confused other people will be confused. – Ramhound Feb 27 '20 at 21:25
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(1) will the mere installation of the SSD, with all its Windows 7 files, somehow inadvertently corrupt the OS in the new computer?

If you keep the Windows 10 drive as the boot drive, no.

(2) what is the best way to remove all the files in the SSD after installation in the new computer and thus have a clean SSD available for extra storage?

You can see the Windows built-in Disk Management app in action at https://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch001765.htm or you can use the command line (steps follow).

The DISKPART command which is standard in Windows 10.

A) From Windows 10, launch a Command Prompt WIN-R CMD Enter

B) In that window, run diskpart

C) In diskpart, do list disk and you should see your boot drive as Disk 0 and your newly added drive as Disk 1. If you don't, stop, go no further, and consult here!

DISKPART> list disks

Microsoft DiskPart version 10.0.16299.15

DISK        - Display a list of disks. For example, LIST DISK.
PARTITION   - Display a list of partitions on the selected disk.
              For example, LIST PARTITION.
VOLUME      - Display a list of volumes. For example, LIST VOLUME.
VDISK       - Displays a list of virtual disks.

DISKPART> list disk

  Disk ###  Status         Size     Free     Dyn  Gpt
  --------  -------------  -------  -------  ---  ---
  Disk 0    Online          XXX GB      0 B        *
  Disk 1    Online          YYY GB      0 B        

D) Do sel disk 1 to pick your newly added old Win 7 drive.

E) Do del partition 1 to remove the first partition.

F) Do list part to check for any other partitions; if there are others, delete them, too, as in step E above.

G) Once all partitions on that drive are gone create partition primary

H) Do FORMAT FS=NTFS LABEL="DATA" QUICK to format it (you can change DATA to some other name if you wish).

I) Do ASSIGN to have Windows assign the next available drive letter.

J) Quit with exit.

K) Check in Explorer for your new empty drive.

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