110

This is something I do frequently

$ mkdir foo
$ cd foo

This works as a single command, but it's more keystrokes and saves no time.

$ mkdir foo && cd foo

Is there a shortcut for this?

Edit

With the use of help below, this seems to be the most elegant answer.

# ~/.bashrc
function mkcd {
  if [ ! -n "$1" ]; then
    echo "Enter a directory name"
  elif [ -d $1 ]; then
    echo "\`$1' already exists"
  else
    mkdir $1 && cd $1
  fi
}
3
  • 1
    You can rename the function to mkdir if you use command mkdir $1 instead of just mkdir $1 in the function body.
    – Andy
    Jun 15, 2010 at 14:50
  • 3
    (1) why not simply "mkdir $1 ; cd $1" instead of "&&"? that way the "cd" succeeds even if the "mkdir" fails, and you don't need the does-it-already-exist scaffolding. (2) as written your function won't work (to prompt you for a directory name). you need to put that in a separate "if" clause from the existence test (currently in "elif"). Jun 15, 2010 at 16:25
  • Or even mkdir -p $1; cd $1 so you can make nested directories and move into them. @quackquixote Oct 6, 2021 at 3:58

11 Answers 11

49

I'm no Linux/bash expert, but try putting this in your .bashrc.

function mkdir
{
  command mkdir $1 && cd $1
}

PS Thanks to Dennis for using command mkdir.

5
  • 3
    Instead of `which mkdir`, just use command mkdir. Jun 15, 2010 at 14:33
  • 1
    Thanks Dennis. There's nothing under man command - could you direct me to a reference? (I can work out what it does, but it pays to be thorough;)
    – Andy
    Jun 15, 2010 at 14:49
  • 2
    command is described in the manual of bash (which it is a built-in of; it's not a separate command). You could also try help command. Jun 15, 2010 at 18:39
  • That also works for zsh btw Dec 23, 2014 at 11:37
  • 1
    Bad idea to overload the usual mkdir and to change its behavior. A lot of scripts use it and assume there is no change of the current directory. Better is to define a command with a different name. Jan 19 at 9:05
118

The bash, zsh Shells

If you don't want another function to remember and don't mind bashisms:

$ mkdir /home/foo/doc/bar && cd $_

The $_ (dollar underscore) bash command variable contains the most recent parameter. So if a user were to type the following at the command line: echo foo bar && echo $_ baz, then the output would be as follows:

foo bar
bar baz

The fish Shell

In the fish shell, I would type the following:

> mkdir /home/foo/doc/bar
> cd alt + ↑

The alt key combined with either the up or the down arrow key will cycle through command parameter history.

7
  • 4
    This works in zsh too. Feb 16, 2014 at 10:01
  • 3
    Can you explain what $_ is? Newbie here.
    – arg20
    Jun 25, 2014 at 15:16
  • @NabilKadimi Did you mean that <kbd>Alt<kbd>+<kbd>⬆<kbd> works well in Zsh? Actually, with zsh 5.4.2 and on-my-zsh, Alt+⬆ gives me character 'A'.
    – Weekend
    Apr 9, 2019 at 5:58
  • Put $_ in quotes as in "$_".
    – Asclepius
    Oct 19, 2020 at 13:39
  • Yeah, that's why I don't use Bourne derived shells. Too many foot guns.
    – kzh
    Oct 19, 2020 at 17:22
48

For oh-my-zsh users:
$ take 'directory_name'

Reference: https://github.com/robbyrussell/oh-my-zsh/wiki/Cheatsheet

2
  • 1
    Can you explain this in more detail?
    – bwDraco
    Jul 13, 2015 at 5:47
  • 1
    @bwDraco type take, then you will get take is a shell function from /home/username/.oh-my-zsh/lib/functions.zsh. vi the file then you get function take() { mkdir -p $@ && cd ${@:$#} }
    – Weekend
    Apr 9, 2019 at 8:59
12

What about:

$ mkdir newdirname; cd $_

It's a bit easier than using &&, combining quack quixote's and kzh's answers.

2
  • 29
    The point of && is that cd will not be executed if the mkdir command fails
    – slhck
    Mar 14, 2012 at 9:29
  • 1
    @slhck actually that was the point of quixote: cd even if mkdir fails (for instance if it already exists, forcing the user to write a second command to actually cd to the path). However contrarily to what this answers says, that's not for easiness: && is not more complicated than ;.
    – moala
    Feb 2, 2013 at 9:13
8

You can try something like this:

#!/bin/sh
mkdir $1 && cd $1

Save this script to some place that is in your path, for example, /usr/local/bin or ~/bin (you have to put this last one into your path in your ~/.profile file). Then you can simply call it.

1
  • 6
    how can this work? it seems to only cd inside the context of the execution of the ~/bin/mkcd script, not the caller of the script. Oct 13, 2013 at 16:15
6
$echo 'mkcd() { mkdir -p "$@" && cd "$_"; }' >> ~/.bashrc
$mkcd < pathtofolder/foldername >
5

Here is a simple function I put in my ~/.config/fish/config.fish file which accomplishes this task:

function mkcd
    mkdir -pv $argv;
    cd $argv;
end

The -pv tag allows for the creation of directories with sub-directories.

1

If you use zsh there is a cool shortcut:

take <Your_folder_name>

and it will create a folder and change to it ;)

0

Depending on the desired outcome if the directory already exists.

Fail if directory already exists

mkcd() {
    mkdir $1 && cd $1
}

Change directory regardless

mkcd() {
    mkdir $1 ; cd $1
}

Usage mkcd some/path/to/my/dir

0

I found that the function below can only make one directory, if I want to make subdirectories at the same time, it doesn't work :

function mkdir
{
  command mkdir $1 && cd $1
}

So I changed it and now its working great!

function mkcd
{
  command mkdir -pv $1 && cd $1 && echo "Now in `pwd`"
}
0

For this is the only way it worked for me

function md
{
  command mkdir -vp $1 && command cd $1 && echo "Now in `pwd`"
}

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