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I want to run different operating systems on one machine. I have Windows 10 already installed and I want to install Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

I made some research and I know that I have a couple of options.

  1. Using a virtual machine (not an option for me)

I don't want to use this option because you can't do whatever you want with a virtual machine. For example, you can't play games or do graphics related things. There are some other limitations also

https://www.pcworld.com/article/2050345/understand-the-limits-of-a-virtual-computer.html

  1. Dual boot on the same disk (not an option for me)

I don't want to use this option because there are some problems with this solution. Sometimes Windows updates changes loader and this may cause that I will have to repair and reinstall a lot of things in order to be able to use Linux. Another issue is related to time management. It also sometimes creates problems. I found a good video about problems with dual booting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9iX2qSfMhE

  1. Dual boot on different disks

I think this is the best solution for me. But I am not sure 100%. Suppose that I have Windows on disk1 and Linux on disk2. Where I can hold my data? I always have a system on one disk and the data on the other. Because the system may crash and I don't want to lose my data.

I always have a copy on external disk but I do this copy once a month so still I might lose some data in case of system crash if this data will be on the same disk as a system.

But on the other hand with two different systems, it is very unlikely that both of these systems will crash. So in case of Windows system failure, I can still log into Linux and I can see the content of the disk on which Windows is. Is it true or not? Can I see the content of both disks after login into Windows and Linux?

I also consider using SteamOS. I am just curious about how it works. But this is not a priority.

I know that some of you may write "Just use Linux and not Windows". But I have some reasons to use Windows. I don't feel comfortable yet with Linux. But there is another more important reason - playing games. I am not a pro gamer but I like to play games from time to time. And even if Windows is the worst operating system in almost every aspect, there is one thing that is most developed on Windows - just games.

So what do you recommend for me? Is it a good solution to install two systems on two disks? And do I need GRUB software to be able to use this? Or just my boot menu is enough? I haven't checked the installation guide yet. And what with SteamOS? Should I use an external drive? Or is it safe to dual boot on the same disk if both systems are Linux or both systems are Windows?

Is this video true if you want to have two or more Linux systems or Windows systems? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9iX2qSfMhE

My laptop specification: enter image description here

  • Why just not to install linux subsistem for windows and practicing with that. – DDS Mar 26 at 10:26
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Kacper777 As per your FIRST questions

I don't want to use this option because you can't do whatever you want with a virtual machine. For example, you can't play games or do graphics related things. There are some other limitations also

I dont think there are much 3D heavey graphics Games or heavy graphics designing softwares for Linux or ubuntu

common things to be kept in mind are virtualisation is not a full blown OS as its never a native piece of software working on a machine its always semi native or virtual as the name suggests, so it’s better to go for a live CD or DVD or install on your HDD… and dual boot them. Vmware is good for just testing purposes, if you really need to dive deep in then it is necessary to install or say dual boot Linux into a separate partition say ext4 or zfs with swap files and all.

still you can see following links and discussions on limitations and problems of ubuntu in virtual machine. The only problems come with virtualisations with devices and peripheral devices like printers dont work Most likely, printers, graphics tablets and other peripherals won't work at all.

https://askubuntu.com/questions/1121951/better-vm-ubuntu-on-windows-10-or-vm-windows-10-on-ubuntu

https://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/virtualbox

https://www.researchgate.net/post/Is_there_any_performance_difference_between_Virtual_System_and_Physical_System

https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/dual-booting-vs-virtual-machine/

Kacper777 As per your SECOND questions

Sometimes Windows updates changes loader and this may cause that I will have to repair and reinstall a lot of things in order to be able to use Linux. Another issue is related to time management. It also sometimes creates problems.

Every problems have solutions. NO PAINS NO GAINS. so tricks and see links below to how to solve the problems

sharing some links to understand the problem and details

https://askubuntu.com/questions/937799/lost-dual-boot-on-windows-update

https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/68581/how-can-i-prevent-windows-from-overwriting-grub-when-using-a-dual-boot-machine

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-windows_install/windows-10-anniversary-update-destroys-boot-loader/93d60fa6-b856-4714-a85a-861b780b9986

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/windows-update-delete-linux/

TIME MANAGEMENT LINKS

http://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2016/05/time-differences-ubuntu-1604-windows-10/

https://www.howtogeek.com/323390/how-to-fix-windows-and-linux-showing-different-times-when-dual-booting/

https://askubuntu.com/questions/700734/windows-10-and-ubuntu-14-04-lts-dual-booting-issues

GUIDES FOR DUAL BOOTINGS

https://www.tecmint.com/install-ubuntu-alongside-with-windows-dual-boot/

https://helpdeskgeek.com/windows-10/how-to-dual-boot-ubuntu-with-windows-10/

https://dev.to/praveenjm2000/making-it-simple-dual-booting-ubuntu-with-windows-10-for-absolute-biginners-2faj

Kacper777 As per your THIRD questions

Where I can hold my data? I always have a system on one disk and the data on the other. Because the system may crash and I don't want to lose my data.

You can save data on a partition of second or first disk you wish and create a partition for backing up image or shadow or mirror of first disk. Keep OS in one disk. Before installing linux its advisable to create a image file of your HDD and data disk.

again sharing links for data corruption as linux is must stable but in once in 1000 there may be chance for corruption due to different file system support of linux and windows.

Many videos and users say there MAY be chance they dont say there should be 100% chance of corruption Still it always better to create an backup image or cloud backup of your data for safety

Corruption Crashes solutions tricks and advice's in other discussions you can read which my be helpful for your knowledge

https://askubuntu.com/questions/1085989/possible-corrupt-ntfs-system-windows-files-still-accessible-via-ubuntu

https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1709302

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/risks-dual-booting-windows-linux-operating-systems/

https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/412990/how-could-windows-not-corrupt-the-linux-file-system-when-messing-up-partition-sc

Hard drive corruption on a dual-boot system

https://www.quora.com/Does-my-Windows-get-affected-if-I-messed-up-in-Linux-while-dual-booting

https://www.quora.com/If-I-install-Ubuntu-on-my-computer-will-it-erase-my-current-operating-system

Kacper777 As per your FOURTH ADVICE AND SUGGESTION REQUEST questions

So what do you recommend for me? Is it a good solution to install two systems on two disks?

firstly its advisable better to keep OS in 1 disk and windows 10 in one partition and linux on other partition and data on other disk for safety and corruption and file system protections which will protect your data and from any hard

secondly its advisable if you have space then create 2 partitions in 1 partition keep the data and second partitions keep the IMAGE file ie. backup of both bootable system HDD and data HDD for your safety ...and if possible keep those images copies in DVD drive or Blue ray disk or on cloud for safety of any HDD or system boot failure

As per my thoughts experience and knowledge, I am to novice and new to linux and was finding solution to learn linux I have not used Ubuntu and want to install on my PC and laptop and my question was same and i founded a best solution for my self may be it suits you to.

The solution i founded is to install Linux on Flash pen drive have not tried and dont know about its pros or cons and problems but think it best suits your problems.

As it will benefit you in following ways :-

  1. No need To install Linux in Dual boot with current OS in your first HDD where your windows 10 is installed

  2. It will also not effect your second HDD with data saved

  3. It will also not effect you to play games in windows

  4. It will also not corrupt any file system or booting files or boot menus GRUB UEFI or any other files.

  5. It will also not take any space in your laptop or HDD.

  6. You can also boot in VM and directly from USB flash drive laptop also

  7. You can move with your flash pen drive at any place other Desktop or Laptop and carry your linux OS in your pocket at any place

  8. Install Ubuntu or linux OS in Flash drive or USB pen drive or External USB HDD SSD and whenever wherever needed Just boot from flash drive and this will not effect your Windows 10 OS or attach or detach your

  9. Now How to install Linux Ubuntu in Flash drive or pen drive or External HDD is a big topic so below is the VIDEOS and link i am sharing it below see it may help you

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIhYitXwJfE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLYBXOVn6ow

http://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2014/11/install-real-ubuntu-os-usb-drive/

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/what-to-do-with-your-usb-flash-drive-run-linux/

https://www.dionysopoulos.me/portable-ubuntu-on-usb-hdd/

https://askubuntu.com/questions/1119700/how-to-fully-install-ubuntu-on-usb-flashdrive

Hope above tips and suggestions and links helped you if any of them worked and suited you do tell me in comments which one worked for you for my knowledge and if not suited or helped you then feel free to ask any doubts for further clarifications and if worked then DONT FORGET to vote and accept the answer

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  • Thank you, great answer! I will test your tips. One more thing. These are my disks. zapisz.net/imagesnew/2020/03/26/… On C I have Windows and this is SSD and it is not that capacious. On D I have my data, programs, videos, films, and the majority of games. And Seagate is an external hard drive and it has almost the same things as disk D because this is a copy. I think this a terrible waste of space. I don't know what is shadow/mirror of the disk but I will check it. – Kacper777 Mar 26 at 20:47
  • But my question now is: how to organize this? Maybe I should move the Windows system on the disk D. And Linux would be on smaller disk, Windows on bigger disk on a separate partition and games and other data on another partition. I know that games like SSD but with this machine is not that a difference in performance. And games take a lot of space. But I have a question. Suppose that I am already logged into the Linux system. Can I use my data from a second bigger disk on Linux? Is it possible to have access to data from both systems? – Kacper777 Mar 26 at 20:53
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Sometimes Windows updates changes loader and this may cause that I will have to repair and reinstall a lot of things in order to be able to use Linux.

This is a non-issue if you're using UEFI boot (and unless you've installed Windows in CSM boot mode, you are - it's been a default for 10 or so years now). With UEFI boot Windows's and Linux's loaders live in their own directories on EFI System Partition (ESP) and don't overwrite each other. The worst that can happen is your boot order can be changed to default to Windows. You can easily change it back in UEFI setup. You can also choose to boot non-default OS (ie. Linux) once and use efibootmgr to change boot order.

Where I can hold my data? I always have a system on one disk and the data on the other. Because the system may crash and I don't want to lose my data.

This is also a non-issue. A "crash" will ruin OS partition at most. Keep your data on a separate partition and you're done.

It's great that you have backups. Disks fail, sometimes without warning. Without backups it's just a matter of time until you lose something - either due to random hardware failure, power spike, software failure, ransomware or accidental deletion. So good job. But! A manual copy is not a proper backup. First, it should be automated - less effort = less friction, you can backup more often. Second, it should be incremental, ie. only differences between current snapshot and previous one are recorded, this way you can restore to any point in time (useful for accidental file deletion) and you don't waste space for duplicates, so even weekly backups become feasible.

If you want to transfer data between OSes, you'll need a filesystem that works well on both systems. NTFS has pretty decent support on Linux. exFAT seems to work well too, but I didn't use it much. Remember to disable fast startup in Windows, otherwise it will hibernate on poweroff and hibernated partitions can't be accessed safely in other OS.

SteamOS isn't designed to be installed in dual boot. If you're new to this, I would advise against it.

My recommendation for a Linux newcomer would be: play games on Windows, learn Linux in a VM. This solves all your problems.

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  • I want to learn Linux, but I also want Linux to increase my productivity. Because Linux is more reliable and has a lot of great features. I saw the feature of workspaces on Linux and it is much better than virtual desktops on Windows. I am planning to use Ubuntu with the KDE desktop environment. I would like to have real Linux, not VM. Virtual machines have a lot of limitations, not only speed. – Kacper777 Mar 26 at 7:48
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    @Kacper777 Linux isn't objectively superior to Windows, despite what some people claim. Speed may not be a concern at all, modern CPUs can run VMs with almost no overhead thanks to hardware virtualization features like VT-x or AMD-V. Graphics performance will be slightly degraded in most setups, but it's usually satisfactory thanks to paravirtualization. What other limitations are you worried about? – gronostaj Mar 26 at 8:18
  • Things described in the first link "If a machine doesn't exist in the real world, it can't possibly have any USB ports, making it difficult to plug in a flash drive. – Kacper777 Mar 26 at 11:44
  • You can, of course, plug the drive into the real computer. But then the host takes control of the drive. It takes a couple of steps and some waiting to "connect" the drive to the VM. That doesn't always work, either." – Kacper777 Mar 26 at 11:45
  • "It will always be slower, have less physical RAM, worse graphics, and fewer gigabytes of storage." I have been using a virtual machine (VirtualBox) for a few months. And when I have a lot of programs running at the same I have lags sometimes. And the system is not working so fast and smoothly like normal Windows which is not in VM. – Kacper777 Mar 26 at 11:45

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