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I was fiddling around and had connected an microcontroller to the usb port on the computer, and after connecting multiple stuff up to it, i got the message on windows that went something like "unusual current draw on usb port". It seems to have detected it and disabled it self. Nice... sort of.

I can power on stuff on that usb port, and even do file transfers etc on that port. But it seems very unreliable for the file transfers. Uploading something to the microcontroller for example gives me midways error about the usb port/peripheral not working.

So the question is, did i partially fry my usb port? Or is there maybe a reactivate button of some sort that i need to go looking for in windows10?

Thanks beforehand! :D



--EDIT more specific details
Computer: Legion T530-28ICB

The setup that i believe fried the port was, ESP32 connected with usb to computer. The ESP32 had a 12V DC motor that was controlled from an external 12V powersupply to power it by switching on a transistor. Now when the DC motor stalled, a much higher current was drawn into the DC Motor from the ESP32 to the transistor and there after the usb port powering the ESP32 itself was deactivated i think :O

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  • Have you done a cold boot since? Devices asking for too much power should be a simple 'no, you can't' & nothing more.
    – Tetsujin
    Oct 3, 2020 at 18:47
  • I have tried that :O, what is really frustating is everything such as usb file transfers etc... works flawless. But the flashing of a microcontroller(uploading files to it) does not work. We don't need to go in details about microcontrollers it was just an example, but i am confident that something is not 100% functional with that port, since the microcontroller does work on the other ports flawlessly.
    – CoffeDev
    Oct 3, 2020 at 19:08
  • How are you powering the microcontroller? If you don't have a source of power other then the PC, that's probably the issue.
    – davidgo
    Oct 3, 2020 at 20:02
  • Connecting arbitrary "a microcontroller" with "multiple stuff connected to it" to unspecified PC with unknown USB port design... Are you serious asking this question without specifying NOTHING?? Oct 4, 2020 at 5:30
  • @Ale..chenski sorry, did not want to go in details about microcontrollers in this stackexchange and confuse people XD Well the structure was, ESP32 connected with usb to computer. The ESP32 had a 12V DC motor that was controlled from an external 12V powersupply to power it by switching on a transistor. Now when the DC motor stalled, a much higher current was drawn into the DC Motor from the ESP32 to the transistor and there after the usb port powering the ESP32 itself was deactivated i think :O
    – CoffeDev
    Oct 4, 2020 at 6:03

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