1

After upgrading to 20H2 I was required to set up a PIN login (at least, I don't recall seeing an option to decline doing so).

Unfortunately, this did several things:

  • It wiped out the password I had been using.
  • It made it impossible for me to access my desktop over my LAN via RDP (e.g., from iOS devices).

I was able to re-activate the password option by defining a new password after logging in via the PIN. Unfortunately, that does not appear to have restored my ability to access the desktop via RDP from my iOS devices.

I'd like to disable, permanently, any trace of PIN login and revert to using only passwords. Is that possible? If so, how do I do it?

I checked out the Sign-in Options settings but, interestingly, it shows "Windows Hello PIN" as "currently unavailable". The detailed error message isn't all that helpful, but it's probably due to my desktop not having a Windows Hello supporting camera.

Additional Info and Resolution

Thanx to the (quick!) responses, all of which were helpful, I was able to resolve my problem and restore the functionality I used to have. I've described what I did in detail at https://imperfect.olbert.com/fixing-microsofts-20h2-login-mess/ and encourage you to check it out.

Again, thanx to everyone for the quick replies!

2

3 Answers 3

2

You can definitely remove the PIN, although it is, in my opinion, not a good idea and I do not recommend that.

First, restart or shut down and start up and notice in Login screen below your login line, there is an icon where you can choose Hello (Fingerprint), PIN, or Password. Select Password and be sure it works. Be very certain.

Now go to Windows 10 Settings, Accounts, Sign in Options and remove Fingerprint, PIN and set as you wish.

Just be very sure about your password.

1
  • 1
    If his PC is domain joined, group policy will prevent him to alter this, and group policy needs to be setup first for him to make changes. By default, domain joined computers will have no access to alter these settings, even if the setting is not configured in the domain.
    – LPChip
    Nov 12, 2020 at 17:21
2

To remove the PIN login as login option:

  • Run Settings > Accounts > Sign-in options
  • Click "Windows Hello PIN"
  • Click the Remove button
  • Click on Remove to confirm.
  • Type the account password to verify and click OK.

The Remove button will be grayed out if this is for a Microsoft account and you have turned on "Require Windows Hello sign-in for Microsoft accounts". To enable the Remove button, you need to turn this off and refresh the "Sign-in options" page in Settings.

3
  • If his PC is domain joined, group policy will prevent him to alter this, and group policy needs to be setup first for him to make changes. By default, domain joined computers will have no access to alter these settings, even if the setting is not configured in the domain.
    – LPChip
    Nov 12, 2020 at 17:20
  • @LPChip: Would such group policy prevent him from defining the PIN in the first place, or there's no connection?
    – harrymc
    Nov 12, 2020 at 17:38
  • Depends, on earlier versions of windows 10 with GPO set to default, one can set the PIN, but later it is set to disabled with a "This setting is managed by .... " message. I think it was Windows 10 v1609 where this behavior changed.
    – LPChip
    Nov 12, 2020 at 18:22
0

As I mentioned in the question body the input I got here was helpful in letting me piece together a solution. Which I documented at https://imperfect.olbert.com/fixing-microsofts-20h2-login-mess/.

4
  • 1
    Please add here the details of your solution and also mark it as the answer. As it stands, this is a link-only answer.
    – harrymc
    Nov 12, 2020 at 21:24
  • I have no intention of rewriting a page or two long answer here. If for some reason that's inadequate, feel free to have this response deleted. I don't care. If the people running superuser et al care about actually sharing helpful information, instead of worrying about whether specific protocols were followed, they'd probably like this left here, too. Oh, and BTW: if you look at my original question I >>did<< include the link and the contextual text in it. I only added it separately because I've noticed not everyone reads entire questions, and >>I<< really want to help people solve problems. Nov 13, 2020 at 1:00
  • The bare details would suffice, to give future readers some idea of what they will find in your link. Anyway, I myself am not a moderator and cannot delete anything.
    – harrymc
    Nov 13, 2020 at 6:51
  • If you read the link (did you?) you might see the “bare details” are somewhat involved because the problem was subtle. If you’d like to summarize what I wrote as an answer I’d be happy to accept it as an answer. I won’t even take/ask for credit. Nov 14, 2020 at 3:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.