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I have an onboard ethernet adapter that is not functioning properly. First off, here are my system specs:

System Specs

Rapr Screenshot: Network Drivers

Symptoms:

Ethernet port status persistently displays "Not Connected", "Network cable unplugged", etc. Have confirmed cable is not faulty (and have tried swapping out between three working cables by this point just to rule out Murphy's Law). Hardware passes all tests PROSet, while Cable Test shows Pass for Quality and Integrity Statuses, but Fail for Cable Length, Cable polarity, Local Receiver, Remote Receiver Statuses:

  Cable Length Status : Failed
This adapter does not have link.  Make sure the cable is connected and the speed and duplex settings are configured correctly on the adapter and link partner.
  Cable polarity Status : Failed
This adapter does not have link.  Make sure the cable is connected and the speed and duplex settings are configured correctly on the adapter and link partner.
  Local Receiver Status : Failed
This adapter does not have link.  Make sure the cable is connected and the speed and duplex settings are configured correctly on the adapter and link partner.
  Remote Receiver Status : Failed
This adapter does not have link.  Make sure the cable is connected and the speed and duplex settings are configured correctly on the adapter and link partner.
  Cable Quality Status : Passed
Cable quality is excellent.
  Cable Integrity Status : Passed
No cable problems detected.

Connection test shows all failed. Just in case it's helpful, here's the PROSet summary view: PROSet Summary

PROSet does detect the port and is able to activate the LED.

Steps Attempted: So far, I have tried everything I was able to come across via search and forum posts, including but not limited to:

  • Clean install of network drivers (OEM hardware-specific support page drivers and ROG forums recommended drivers and Intel's I219-V drivers and Windows Update Catalog driver matched via hardware ID and Windows default driver)
  • Updated to most current BIOS version, chipset, and all remaining drivers
  • Reviewed all UEFI settings
  • Removed other possible driver conflicts (that I was reasonably able to identify)
  • Hard reset (disable, remove power supply 15 mins, reboot, re-enable)
  • Etc, etc, can't remember off the top of my head what else I've tried, but pretty much everything I could find I've already tried.

Related Posts:

Getting desperate here, any ideas or thoughts at all would be appreciated!

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  • On board Ethernet ports are generally not easily replaced. Get a USB Ethernet Adapter to see if the problem is hardware or software. – John Dec 19 '20 at 15:29
  • By hardware, I had meant that in a localized sense (within my system), there's no problems from the wall and beyond. – Arctiic Dec 19 '20 at 15:44
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    This is either a Windows problem or a hardware fault, you need to isolate it first. Simpler way to isolate than those links... Boot a Linux live distro on USB, it's fairly easy and you don't need to know much about Linux, just follow some simple instructions. Intel Ethernet (and WiFi) drivers are built into every modern Linux kernel, so it will just work on boot. If it doesn't work, you have confirmed a hardware issue. Also, get a USB Ethernet adapter, they are fairly cheap, connect it and test. If it work, confirmed hardware issue, if it doesn't work, then 99% chance it's a software issue. – acejavelin Dec 19 '20 at 16:03
  • @acejavelin Can you elaborate why a USB ethernet adapter's ability to function would act as qualitative indicator for an onboard/PCIe counterpart's functional status? Not to doubt you, I'm just not knowledgeable regarding the mechanics involved and would like to understand the causal relationship. – Arctiic Dec 19 '20 at 21:53
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The easiest way to troubleshoot if the problem is hardware or software is to boot into a completely different environment.

The simplest method would be to create a USB bootable Linux distro, like Ubuntu. Here is a guide on how to create one. There are many Live distros and guides, but this should suffice.

Boot off the USB drive into the Ubuntu Live environment. Assuming your home network is set up for DHCP, as most are, Ubuntu will automatically detect and configure your Intel ethernet hardware. Be sure to just select "Try Ubuntu" and not "Install Ubuntu." At that point, you should be able to browse the web with Firefox. If you are familiar with Linux, you can perform other tests as well.

If you continue to have problems, then this definitely points to a hardware issue. Onboard ethernet is essentially unreplaceable. Your best bet would be to get an add on card to use for ethernet.

If you do not have any problems, then its definitely a driver or configuration issue within Windows.

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  • I've done as you've advised, and it seems that unfortunately from Ubuntu the same status is showing up ("cable unplugged"). However, is there any way to more definitively verify the hardware is bad? I'm feeling reluctant on giving up just yet considering the adapter isn't completely unresponsive. Although I realize it might not at all be a representative indicator of it's current functional capacities, I'm holding out hope due to the device's partial responsiveness (tests passing, LED blinking, etc). – Arctiic Dec 19 '20 at 21:07
  • @Arctiic Try it with a different router/switch. If it still happens, stop wasting your time. Buy an ethernet card and move on. It will save you time and effort. – Keltari Dec 19 '20 at 21:57

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