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chkdsk /r

Does it check current volume or does it check every volume (full drive)?

I read somewhere that without letter it works on current volume (so c: if I run it from c:/) so I decided to be fancy and run it like this for checking c: (I have disk problem and previously chkdsk fixed them). But now it is running for far too long, recently I run it on c: it was for 1-2 hours and now it is >5 hours. Not sure is it checking everything or is my disk having problems.

Can't google it out because of "how to run chkdsk on volume without letter".

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    Hint for future searches. Even though it's not a unix tool, searching "man (toolname)" will usually get you the full instruction set for usage. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/administration/… – Tetsujin Feb 26 at 17:15
  • I believe it runs in the context of the current drive. Beware though that the r option takes a lot longer than f so you may be looking at the consequence of the option flag. – JG7 Feb 26 at 17:18
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Chkdsk is volume specific, as it it works with file systems. It is unaware of the physical or virtual disk(s) that the specified volume occupies.

You are correct, when running chkdsk without a volume parameter, it uses the current volume. Microsoft's documentation does not mention this, but this is definitely the case.

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  • I run it all the time without volume parameter, it will check the currently booted volume. – Moab Feb 26 at 18:33
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    @Moab Currently booted volume? I think you mean the current volume. I'm currently on a laptop with a single drive so can't verify it, but I'm pretty sure if you do cd D: & chkdsk it will check the D: drive, not the C: drive that you booted from. – Carey Gregory Feb 27 at 2:19
  • I do have several volumes and I can confirm that without parameters it uses the current volume. – Martin Argerami Feb 27 at 5:22

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