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I saw somewhere that: computer A in the process of pinging computer C should map its MAC address to its IP address because Ethernet is used in this scenario and packet needs to be encapsulated and sent on the wire.
Now the question is, is there a case where we do not need the destination MAC address?
And is it possible that a device does not have the necessary second and third layer communication tools?
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I saw somewhere that computer A in the process of pinging computer C should map its MAC address to its IP address because Ethernet is used in this scenario and packet needs to be encapsulated and sent on the wire.

More accurately: If A is connected to a LAN or WLAN, then whenever A sends out packets, the hardware will add the MAC address of A to the packet in the LAN or WLAN. No need to "map it". A will also need the MAC address of C, and if A only knows the IP address of C, then it needs to "map it" (via ARP for IPv4).

Conversely, when A receives packets, the other computer in the same LAN or WLAN (usually the gateway/router) will have to find out the MAC address of A first, using the IP address of A.

Now the question is, is there a case where we do not need the destination MAC address?

Whenever you send a packet on LAN or WLAN, you need the destination MAC address, and the hardware will add the source MAC address.

Conversely, if you are connected via something that doesn't use MAC addresses (for example, internet over a serial port using SLIP), then you don't need MAC addresses.

And is it possible that a device does not have the necessary second and third layer communication tools?

It wouldn't make much sense to connect such a device to a LAN or WLAN ...

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    It sounds like OP was talking about mapping computer C (i.e. destination) addresses, not the source...
    – user1686
    May 8 at 19:32
  • Yes user1686 you got it right.
    – Truth
    May 8 at 19:58
  • @dirkt can you answer with this assumption?
    – Truth
    May 8 at 20:01

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