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I want to install Arch Linux, but my existing partitions look weird. This mmcblk1 is the drive for my SD card on my laptop I think. But the main space is on it (58,2G). The last OS I used was Lenovo with Windows 10. Is there a way to just erase all of this? Sry I know this is a noob question, but I used Arch Linux for 10 years but had to switch to Windows 10 because of workplace requierments and now I forgot many things but I want to use it again, because I loved it (got it booting in like 10 seconds). And I also never encountered partitions like mmcblk1 or something. Can someone help me? I promise I'll don't ask further question, if the answer is helpfull. (I want to install arch by iso from my usb drive, which is sda, but shouldn't the usb drive be sdb?)

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    Indeed "mmcblk" is quite typical this days with some SSDs and more so with embedded flash memory. It follows that your USB stick comes as "sda" because there's no other "sdX". ;) With so small size you can't really have a dual-boot which would be likely the better option. So, of course, you can delete everything in that internal drive, knowing that will remove Windows entirely. – ChanganAuto May 11 at 17:32
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And I also never encountered partitions like mmcblk1

mmcblk1 is not a partition; it's the whole SD card.

Only hd* and sd* devices use alphabetic names; most other device types use numeric indexes.

Device type Whole devices Partitions on 1st device
Legacy PATA (non-libata) hda, hdb, … hda1, hda2, …
SCSI (and ATA via libata) sda, sdb, … sda1, sda2, …
Loop loop0, loop1, … loop0p1, loop0p2, …
SD/MMC mmcblk0, mmcblk1, … mmcblk0p1, mmclbk0p2, …
NVMe nvme0n1, nvme1n1, … nvme0n1p1, nvme0n1p2, …

However, as long as your laptop is a "regular" x86-64 system, the actual partitioning method still remains the same: instead of running fdisk /dev/sda you run fdisk /dev/mmcblk1 but then create partitions as before.

(Note: Names shown by 'fdisk' might not always match the actual names used by kernel.)

(I want to install arch by iso from my usb drive, which is sda, but shouldn't the usb drive be sdb?)

Only if you already have another SCSI/ATA device occupying the name "sda"... but you don't. Your computer has no other SCSI nor ATA devices – it only has an SD card, which is an MMC device.

Because your USB stick is the first (and only) device of this type, it gets the first name in the series (which is sda).

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