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My connection is now on fiber and since that was realized, all my IP addresses shifted from 192.168.1.xxx to 192.168.2.xxx.

I have tried to revert them back to 192.168.1.xxx, but without luck. Now for most part this is not a problem. I just had to configure a lot of stuff with the new address and that seems to work just fine now. But I do have a problem with reaching my VSeven MPEG24 switch which has a default address of 192.168.1.1 which is in another subnet. I have no clue how to solve that. I've tried hard resetting the switch, but I can't connect to it anymore.

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  • Apparently your ISB modem/router gives out DHCP to your devices, and that subnet changed when your service changed. Set your devices up to the new subnet.
    – John
    Jul 25 at 12:19
  • Does superuser.com/questions/1657740/… answer the question?
    – user1686
    Jul 25 at 12:24
  • Would not this fit better at Network Engineering SE ?
    – Veverke
    Jul 26 at 20:06
  • Once you gain connection again, you should be able to enter the router configuration and choose whatever DHCP pool range you want (aka, your previous one). If you neeed some machines with a fixed IP, you still can do it with DHCP, you only have to configure the DHCP service to give IP adress X to the machine with the MAC Y.
    – bradbury9
    Jul 27 at 6:27
36

Temporarily change one of your computers' IP address to be in the 192.168.1.0/24 range and you should be able to connect to your switch (you will be disconnected from the Internet). Then just configure your switch's IP to be in the 192.168.2.0/24 network and switch back your computer's IP address to whatever it was.

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  • 6
    And, better yet, if OP doesn't understand what DHCP is or how it works, or how networking and subnets work, then it's sensible advice to stop using manually configured IP addresses altogether.
    – J...
    Jul 26 at 12:53
  • 4
    I know what DHCP is and how it works. But that knowledge doesn't explain why the addresses changed after going to a Fiber connection. I can't stop using configured IP addresses because some applications in my home expect the IP address to be fixed. Jul 26 at 13:10
  • 8
    @PaulSinnema Then you can't have some upstream service provider controlling what subnet you are on.
    – Kaz
    Jul 26 at 13:49
  • 2
    @PaulSinnema DHCP runs on your integrated fiber/cable/dsl router. When you change your primary router, the DHCP server goes with it and you get whatever default subnet it's configured with out of the box. If you need internal static IPs then you need to understand DHCP and take control of it, either by shifting that responsibility away from your ISPs provided combo/router device to something else on your network that can provide DHCP services, or by actively configuring DHCP on that provided device to suit the needs of your internal network.
    – J...
    Jul 26 at 16:43
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    @PaulSinnema "I know what DHCP is and how it works", ok fine. "But that knowledge doesn't explain why the addresses changed after going to a Fiber connection", ah, it seems you were mistaken.
    – PcMan
    Jul 26 at 17:46

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