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Can you tell me what kind of port the larger circular port is as seen on this picture?

enter image description here

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    Are we really at the point that if it doesn't look like a USB charging port then it's unrecognizable? I feel old...
    – MonkeyZeus
    Jul 26 at 15:02
  • @MonkeyZeus - it's not so much it's unrecognisable, but that it totally fails to include the necessary standard symbols to be able to find a replacement using the info on the port alone. The OP is going to need the manual.
    – Tetsujin
    Jul 26 at 15:33
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    @Tetsujin Has the symbol for DC power changed recently?
    – MonkeyZeus
    Jul 26 at 15:39
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    No, but it's short of important info. Voltage, amperage & polarity. All 3 symbols should be there. At least, unlike those stupid USB 2 ports, you don't have to try it three ways round before it fits :P
    – Tetsujin
    Jul 26 at 15:40
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    Look on the bottom of the device (docking station?) and see if there's a diagram with + and - symbols and the expression "Vdc". Jul 26 at 23:55
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This port is for DC power, thus an AC/DC powerconverter. You need an adapter or powerbrick suited for this pc. Do note, not every adapter that has the same port will work. The voltage and amperage must also match the computer.

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    Although not specified by symbol, polarity also matters for this DC jack.
    – Josh Zhang
    Jul 26 at 15:07
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    @LawrenceC - it might be 'universal' but unless the manual tells what voltage, amperage & polarity, you won't get too many free guesses before something goes bang.
    – Tetsujin
    Jul 26 at 15:29
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    LPChip - strictly speaking the port is for DC power. I know what you mean by AC/DC, that it it needs a transformer from one to the other… but it's not crystal clear if you don't understand the symbol implicitly.
    – Tetsujin
    Jul 26 at 15:30
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    @LawrenceC - that really is potentially dangerous advice. That socket type could be for literally anything from 1.5 to 25v [though it's likely to be for 12-24 on a laptop]. Get it wrong & you risk blowing the circuit.
    – Tetsujin
    Jul 26 at 16:46
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    @Tetsujin Edited the post even though my initial thought was, that it was clear enough.
    – LPChip
    Jul 27 at 6:40

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