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I've created a windows 10 Pro virtual machine (21H1) in virtualbox 6.1.26 on a Linux Mint host.

The network adapter is bridged and the VM is pingable on the local network at its IP Address.

I've set VirtualBox's display setting for the VM to enable the server on port 3389 with null authentication.

I've been through the Windows settings to ensure that Remote desktop is enabled and netstat -an | find "3389" shows that the VM is listening on port 3389 for both TCP and UDP protocols.

When I try to connect from another machine on the network (I've tried with a Windows 10 machine as well as trying to RDP from the Mint Host box into the VM using its IP address) I am prompted for the username and password, but on providing these the connection appears to begin (the VM in the background locks the screen) but then immediately disappears and the rdp session never begins.

I've checked the event viewer on the VM for the remote desktop connections but it shows an event id 1149 which seems to indicate that the authentication was successful as it notes the username and the correct incoming IP address for the Host machine - there's nothing indicating why the session immediately drops.

Have I missed something in the configuration of either VirtualBox or the Win10 VM? Any suggestions appreciated.

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  • Do you want to use VirtualBox's "universal" RDP on the host or Windows's RDP on the guest? In case of the former, the VM shouldn't realize someone is connecting and it shouldn't lock the screen. With the latter you'd configure it in guest's settings, not VirtualBox's.
    – gronostaj
    Aug 18, 2021 at 7:24
  • @gronostaj I want to connect to this VM from a Windows 10 laptop which is on the same network (essentially inside my network I want to connect from 192.168.0.30 to 192.168.0.80). I think I've got all the settings right in Win10 to allow remote desktop to connect, and I've added my user so it has the permission to do so. But when I connect I get prompted for the user/pass and then the dialog that the session was ended.
    – Dave
    Aug 18, 2021 at 9:02
  • I don't think we're on the same page. Windows has a built-in RDP feature. This feature is enabled in Windows settings and you're connecting to the VMs IP to use it. You have to provide Windows user's credentials and Windows will log others out when you do so. VirtualBox also has an RDP feature which works for all kinds of guests, not just Windows. It's configured in VBox's settings and uses configured credentials, not Windows credentials. In this case you have to connect to host's IP and Windows guest doesn't know you're connecting. Which one do you want to use? Which IP are you using?
    – gronostaj
    Aug 18, 2021 at 9:21
  • The windows VM is 192.168.0.80 (and is hosted on a linux mint machine with the IP address 192.168.0.18). I'm trying to connect from a windows 10 machine at 192.168.0.30 using the standard rdp application and using the windows VM IP address. My understanding was that configuring the VM to use a bridged network adapter would essentially make the VM be accessible across the LAN directly?
    – Dave
    Aug 18, 2021 at 9:30
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    It wouldn't tunnel. With that setting enabled VBox itself is the RDP server and you don't have to enable anything on guest. It works with all guests no matter the OS and edition too, because it's just streaming image from guest's virtual screen over RDP and translating RDP inputs into virtual device inputs. As for your issue, unfortunately I don't know a solution - I hoped it's just a mixup of these 2 RDP servers.
    – gronostaj
    Aug 18, 2021 at 10:36

1 Answer 1

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You have to decide which RDP server you want to use.

Windows has a built-in RDP feature. This feature, which is available in Pro editions of Windows, can be enabled in Windows settings. You're connecting to it using VM's IP. You have to provide Windows user's credentials and Windows will log others out when you do so.

VirtualBox also has a RDP feature. It works for all kinds of guests, not just Windows and not just Pro editions, because VBox itself becomes the RDP server. It's configured in VBox's settings and uses configured credentials, not Windows credentials. In this case you have to connect to host's IP and Windows guest doesn't know you're connecting.

These two are completely independent and not mutually exclusive.

If Windows's built-in RDP doesn't work, you can give VirtualBox's one a try if it works for your setup.

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