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I have been testing out eCryptfs on Ubuntu 18.04. I was happy with it until I discovered that after I unmounted an encrypted volume, a user with root access can mount it again with a newly generated passpharse which then generates a new key which unencrypts the encrypted folder and files with. It would seem to eCryptfs security is linked to Ubuntu's user access level security, in this case root access which overides the passphrase security level. Am I wrong? And what could I do to make eCryptfs more secure and prevent passphrase overwrite. Thank you.

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  • “a user with root access can mount it again with a newly generated passpharse which then generates a new key which unencrypts the encrypted folder and files” – Does it though? I have a hard time believing this could actually work. Sure you can just use whatever key to decrypt, but that won’t result in the original data.
    – Daniel B
    Oct 23 at 14:19
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@Daniel B, Thanks very much for your reply. I have done further testing and am now satisfied with the security of eCryptfs. It is all good as far as security goes. One should just be absolutely certain they are entering the correct paraphrase in order not to end up being confused. As strangely it will let you mount an previously encrypted folder with a new passphrase and generates a new signature key which it appends to the sig-cache.txt file. However the data is still encrypted and inaccessible. A user who is not sure about their passphrase is given false hope when they find that they are able to mount the encrypted folder with wrong paraphrase. I am going to keep on using eCryptfs. Thank you again.

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    Oct 24 at 20:14

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