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NEED help, My primary language is not English, so here it goes: I already destroyed one of my flash drive Transcend Jetflash 790 32GB. GOT a replacement from the warranty. I'm trying to dual boot Linux (testing the distros) with win 11 pro. So I used RUFUS to flash it in DD mode. My system is UEFI and GPT. After a successful setup how do I restore my flash drive. I already messed up my previous one and caused a No media Drive.

How do I restore the flash drive (too its Original CONFIG 1 partition FAT32) after using it to flash a Linux ISO in DD mode? In DD mode it creates multiple partitions (or copies) sometimes multiple USB drives for instance. And can't seem to delete all partitions to reformat to only 1. I tried to reparation it in Linux Mint and after Erasing for 16mins and 99.9% it failed to restore to the original config but successfully removed all partitions. Then in windows, I deleted the whole partition and created a new drive and now it works fine. So the QUESTION is What is the proper way to restore a USB flash device after using it in Rufus to create an ISO in DD mode without destroying the flash drive.

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  • In Linux Mint you may want to use Disks to remove all partitions, create and format a new one. Or, much simpler, use MKUSB and its "restore to a standard storage device" feature: help.ubuntu.com/community/mkusb May 31 at 16:45
  • Please clarify your specific problem or provide additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it's hard to tell exactly what you're asking.
    – Community Bot
    May 31 at 16:46
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    Rufus does not destroy drives. A drive may fail after any action (or spontaneously). You usually use Rufus to write relatively huge amount of data at once, so the chances are the drive will fail then; but not because you did something that wrong. Neither Rufus, nor dd, wipefs, shred, badblocks, gparted, nor any other tool that simply writes/reads the drive provides a mode that deliberately destroys the drive. (There are tools that can cast potentially dangerous SCSI/SATA/… commands (e.g. hdparm), but they warn you in their manuals, you don't need them, you haven't used them.) May 31 at 17:03
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    Does this answer your question? Rufus Damaged my USB. Windows can not detect USB May 31 at 17:07

2 Answers 2

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The easiest way is, arguably, using MKUSB, in any Debian or Ubuntu derivatives, Linux Mint included:

  1. sudo add-apt-repository universe #usually not required because most Ubuntu flavor and unofficial derivatives already have this repository enabled by default;
  2. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mkusb/unstable
  3. sudo apt update
  4. sudo apt install mkusb usb-pack-efi

Run MKUSB with the USB stick connected and then select the following option:

enter image description here

WARNING: Make sure you're selecting the correct drive. This operation is irreversible!

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  • I would argue that, if OP used Rufus to create the drive, then the easiest way is to also use Rufus to restore the drive, hence my answer.
    – Akeo
    Jun 1 at 12:06
  • Although my main OS is not Linux ,but thanks a lot I'll learn it asap. Jun 1 at 13:26
  • @Akeo The OP mentioned attempts in Linux Mint hence this answer. And it's written in a way that suggests Windows/Rufus weren't accessible now or not convenient. Jun 1 at 13:55
  • @Tanvirmahmud You can upvote either answer if useful but you can accept only one. Jun 1 at 13:56
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What is the proper way to restore a USB flash device after using it in Rufus to create an ISO in DD mode without destroying the flash drive.

This is answered in the Rufus FAQ:

What you really want to do is "restore" your drive to non-bootable state. And, of course Rufus has a very prominent way to allow you to do that.

See the Boot selection dropdown in Rufus? The one that has a Non bootable entry? Well, if you select that option, and pick whatever you want for the file system, then Rufus will happily "restore" your media to something Windows will recognize, with full capacity, and that you can use again to transfer files.

In short, the "proper" way is also to use Rufus to restore your flash drive. Just select Non bootable in the dropdown, and you'll be good.

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  • In my previous flash drive I attempted just (NON BOOTABLE) that but forgot which Partition scheme I choose. It then created the partitions into multiple USB flash drives and then i tried this and that and caused the drive to be No media. Thanks I'll try your method carefully this time. Jun 1 at 13:25
  • @Tanvirmahmud Rufus didn't cause the "no media" even if you messed up the options. As commented above "A drive may fail after any action (or spontaneously). You usually use Rufus to write relatively huge amount of data at once, so the chances are the drive will fail then; but not because you did something that wrong." Jun 1 at 13:59

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