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I wanted to scan the entirely of my home network using Nmap but was unsure of how I would go about this.

My default gateway and subnet mask are 192.168.0.1 and 255.255.255.0 respectively, so I first tried nmap -sS 192.168.0.1/24. However, this only seemed to scan from 192.168.0.0 to 192.168.0.255. What would be the best way to scan my entire local network instead of just that one segment? Would nmap -sS 192.168.0.1/8 scan everything from 192.0.0.0 to 192.255.255.255?

I would preferably like to start at the very beginning of ip ranges 10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255 to catch all networked devices like printers on my network but was wondering if this was feasible and how I could speed this up. As a /24 scan is taking me over 3 minutes.

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    I have the feeling that the OP is missing an understanding of basic network concepts and that the question is more about this and not about actual security. Note that if the network mask is 255.255.255.0 (as given) then /24 describes the entire network, i.e. things like 192.255.255.255 are not part of the local network. See also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildcard_mask Sep 17, 2022 at 8:25
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    With a class C /24, 255 hosts is your entire local network. There are no hosts outside of that to scan. All devices on your network are in that range. Sep 17, 2022 at 12:40

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The very first thing you need to do is read and understand the nmap documentation, RFC1918 & RFC4632.

With a gateway of 192.168.0.1 and subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, 192.168.0.0/24 is your network. You could use 192.168.0.0/16 to attempt to scan everything from 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.255.255, though I have a suspicion that will not yield results outside of the 192.168.0.0/24 range.

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