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I'm not too good with networking so I'm not sure if the title makes any sense or not. I will try explaining my requirements a bit more here:

The router provided by my ISP is on the 1st floor of my house. There is a LAN cable connecting the router of the 1st floor to a router on the ground floor.

I tried enabling port forwarding on my PC on the ground floor but that didn't work. For port forwarding to work, the LAN cable coming from the 1st floor needs to be connected directly to my PC. If I connect a router to the LAN cable and then connect the PC to the router, the port forwarding doesn't work.

My question is, if I buy a network switch, would that help with this matter? The cable coming from the ISP router (1st floor) would be connected to the switch. Then the PC and router on the ground floor would be connected to the switch. Would this allow me to use the router and enable port forwarding on my PC too? The switch I'm thinking of buying is TP-Link LS1005G which is an unmanaged switch.

Here's a visual representation of the setup that I'm thinking of using.

Visual Representation of the setup

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  • Port forwarding requires the main ISP router to accept the open port. Adding a switch will not help.
    – anon
    Commented Jun 13, 2023 at 11:42
  • Why do you really need a 2nd "router"? Having two routers (doing router functions) on a network isn't a good idea any way (aka double NAT). Can the ISP router be swapped out altogether, or put in bridge mode (to act as a modem only if it is a modem/router combo)? Commented Jun 13, 2023 at 12:06

2 Answers 2

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user1686's answer is one of the ways to do this.

This would effectively use the ISP's router as your router, and make the second router a switch.

If there are no other devices connected to the ISP router, another option is to just bridge all the traffic directly to the second router.

There are 2 ways to do this.

  1. Set the ISP modem/router into bridge mode. This effectively turns the modem/router into a modem only. Often, this is not something you can do yourself, but your ISP can do this for you if you contact their customer support.

  2. Turn on DMZ on the ISP router and select the ipaddress of your 2nd router. This will try to forward everything. This will work for 98% of the traffic and is usually enough, although option 1 is still better.

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Yes, any Ethernet switch would work in this situation, although it's not the only option here – the connection through the router can be made to work:

For port forwarding to work, the LAN cable coming from the 1st floor needs to be connected directly to my PC. If I connect a router to the LAN cable and then connect the PC to the router, the port forwarding doesn't work.

Because it's a router. In addition to the "Wifi" part, it's set up to behave much like your ISP router already does – it creates its own IP network, performs NAT, has its own "port forwarding" rules.

If Wi-Fi is all you want from the second router, it would be easy to disable the "router" features and switch it to plain bridge mode (which is something that has been discussed many times on this site), essentially turning it into an Ethernet switch that also has Wi-Fi.

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