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I have tried attaching this microphone (3.5mm audio jack) to my android to see if the device was the issue, but it still is not detected. On windows, it comes up as a headphone rather than a microphone, is there anyway to fix this?

This is the microphone I have: https://www.kmart.com.au/product/gaming-microphone-42959564/

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    A microphone and headphone are basically the same and can be used the same, it is therefor the port that determines what it is. If you have a standard 3.5mm input, make sure you plug it in on the microphone port, not the speaker/headphones port. Some motherboards can change the port if they detect a different device, in that case, use the control panel to change it back.
    – LPChip
    Dec 8, 2023 at 12:23
  • Headphone or headset? Dec 8, 2023 at 12:23
  • @LPChip The one on my laptop is for headphones and audio as it has the headset symbol on it and it has worked previously as a microphone using that jack.
    – Akshat
    Dec 8, 2023 at 12:31
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    @LPChip - Also, "a mic & headphone are basically the same" is fine in principal, but wildly misleading in practise.
    – Tetsujin
    Dec 8, 2023 at 13:10
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    @LPChip - yes, I'm fully aware of that, I'm actually a retired sound engineer;) It's still highly misleading in this context. A computer will use a simple 'which pins are connected, at what impedances' to try figure this out. Speakers/headphones will have an impedance between 4 - 250Ω, a cheap mic somewhere in the thousands, 2.000Ω or more …but how does it figure it out if there are 'too many pins' for a mic, but 'too much impedance' for headphones? That's where some struggle.
    – Tetsujin
    Dec 8, 2023 at 14:28

1 Answer 1

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The jack [TRS] on your mic is one normally used used for camera mic inputs, rarely for computer mics.

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To a computer, that looks like a headphone jack [TRS], not a headset jack [TRRS], which would look like this

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To a computer, a simple mic jack [TS] should look like this

enter image description here

Some computers can automatically figure out all the combinations, but few are ever smart enough to be able to tell the difference between headphones & mic if they're both on the same jack type.

A computer will use a simple 'which pins are connected, at what impedances' to try figure this out. Speakers/headphones will have an impedance between 4 - 250Ω, a cheap mic somewhere in the thousands, 2.000Ω or more …but how does it figure it out if there are 'too many pins' for a mic, but 'too much impedance' for headphones? That's where some struggle.

See CableChick - Understanding TRRS and Audio Jacks for a more comprehensive guide.

What you need is a camera mic to headset adapter, such as this one from Røde [who make a lot of mics, for cameras & otherwise].

enter image description here

This will then force your computer to see it as a headset… just without earphones. It may show a phantom output, but you can ignore it.

There used to be additional confusion over the precise pinout of a TRRS jack, but thankfully just about everything has now settled on the CTIA standard.

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