0

I have two internet routers and a router "C" ( Model TP-Link TL-WR841N ) to which my all local devices are connected. I want to know if there can be a way to make the router "C" act as bridge and be able to connect one of the two internet routers as per my demand to my router "C" without affecting IP configuration for my local devices.

Also one of my internet device do not have LAN so i will need to use my router "C" wifi to connect to that device and bridge internet from it to my local devices. Can it be done by all routers or any specific router is required for this setup?

1 Answer 1

0

I want to know if there can be a way to make the router "C" act as bridge and be able to connect one of the two internet routers as per my demand to my router "C" without affecting IP configuration for my local devices.

Then it should be the opposite of a bridge (i.e. it should be literally a router), because if "C" does its own routing, then your devices will only need to care about the IP configuration of "C" itself. Whereas if it did act as a transparent bridge to A/B, then your devices would instead need to care about the IP configuration of both "A" and "B" directly.

If "C" remains a router, then you could just physically swap which of your "Internet" routers is connected to the WAN port of "C". The latter will get an appropriate IP address for itself, and your devices won't notice anything happened.

One way of doing it without swapping cables:

  1. Make sure the two Internet routers have different IP addresses. It would be easiest if they were in the same subnet (and if that subnet did not conflict with the "C" LAN subnet), e.g. router "A" would be 192.168.5.1 and router "B" would be 192.168.5.2.
  2. Get a cheap 5-port Ethernet switch.
  3. Connect both Internet routers to the switch, and connect the "C" WAN port to the same switch.
  4. Set "C" to use a static IP address for its WAN interface (e.g. 192.168.5.3 in this example) and specify one of your Internet routers as the "gateway".
  5. Whenever you need to switch connections, just edit the WAN "gateway" parameter in "C".

On 'real' generic router firmware (i.e. one that doesn't have a hard WAN/LAN distinction, such as OpenWRT or RouterOS or EdgeOS) this could be achieved even without the separate switch, by decoupling one of the LAN ports for use as "WAN2".

Also one of my internet device do not have LAN so i will need to use my router "C" wifi to connect to that device

If you mean the device needs to connect to router "C" – no problem; that's what "C" already does out of the box. (You're literally describing regular Wi-Fi.)

The opposite, where the device acts as a Wi-Fi "access point" and requires some other device to connect to the device, is unlikely to happen. But if it does happen, the required router feature would be "station mode" or "extender mode" or "WISP mode" or "client mode" or... well, it has many names.

6
  • Thank you so much for such a detailed answer, that is exactly what i was looking for, a little bit unclear for the second part though. One of the internet device can only be connected with wifi ( i.e. it does not have LAN ports ). In that case i suppose you suggest that C will have to be in station mode etc to be able to provide internet to connected local network devices to "C". Is that corrent?
    – ProgNi
    Feb 1 at 11:06
  • No, I'm saying the opposite. In nearly all cases, C will have to be in access-point mode, i.e. the normal Wi-Fi mode that it already has enabled from factory. Feb 1 at 11:48
  • Then how is C going to connect to the router that has only wifi available from it for the connectivity? do i need another middle router for this? in that case i will have two internet devices and two routers?
    – ProgNi
    Feb 2 at 5:30
  • Ah, wait, so you mean one of your routers doesn't have LAN? Feb 2 at 6:25
  • Yes, One of the internet device that i want to use along with the other does not have LAN. It can only be connected with wifi
    – ProgNi
    Feb 3 at 7:11

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .