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I'am running win XP sp2. How to check that whether I have admin rights or not?

I can't check the system properties. I don't have that much items in the configuration panel. It seems I don't have admin rights, but how to check that formally ? Is there any command line tools for that?

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  • I'd be very curious to see a general solution which accounts for subgroups in Administrators.
    – user49214
    Feb 14, 2012 at 0:09
  • Can you use whoami ? I guess it is built-in in Windows xp2? Jul 21, 2014 at 3:17
  • 5
    See also superuser.com/questions/667607/… Dec 5, 2016 at 7:59

7 Answers 7

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Start -> Run -> cmd.exe

net user <username>

Will show your local group memberships at the bottom of the output so its easy to find. This is probably a lot faster than bumbling through a GUI to look for options (win+R,cmd,enter, no mouse involved).

If you're on a domain, use localgroup instead:

net localgroup Administrators

Check the list of local groups with localgroup on its own.

net localgroup
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  • Not really any faster than this answer (assuming it's correct) -- superuser.com/questions/27263/… (from the kbd: WIN-ESC-MENU)
    – arathorn
    Aug 21, 2009 at 17:30
  • Not really faster, but better answers the question, since it specifically asked about command line tools. Aug 21, 2009 at 17:34
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    This method does not work if your account is in a Windows network domain. Also, it's possible that you are not directly a member of Administrators, but you are indirectly a member, through another group. This is true in my case, and therefore my name does not show up under Administrators even though I am a member of a group which itself is a member of Administrators. Aug 21, 2009 at 17:54
  • Faster may be subjective. As a primarily keyboard-focused user, it is for me, than reaching for the mouse.
    – jtimberman
    Aug 21, 2009 at 17:54
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    ok , sorry for the delay, I see only now all that comments. Actually at my work we are using a domain, et just before leaving I launched the command and didn't see my users (as stated above). Nevertheless it's all my fault (Although I didn't know it could play) I didn't specify that point. Your answer remains interesting (and deserves all its upvote) Thank you jtimberman ! :-) Aug 21, 2009 at 20:31
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Another very simple way on XP is to right-click on the clock in the tray and select the Adjust Date/Time command. You get a message if you don't have admin rights.

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  • Other users can be granted access via secpol.msc. I do that for Interactive sometimes. Dec 4, 2016 at 0:40
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There is a very easy way to check if the current user has local admin rights in xp:

  1. right click on start
  2. check if you have the option to "open all users"
  3. if it's there, you have admin rights
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  • Cannot verify in XP, but this definitely does not work in Vista. I am a member only of the Users group and I have the "open all users" menu.
    – shufler
    Aug 21, 2009 at 20:36
  • I don't use Vista, but I use this "check" all the time in XP on other PCs
    – FrankS
    Aug 22, 2009 at 8:30
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If you add the /domain switch to the net command it will run the command at the domain level. That should help those that are looking to run the command on those types of groups and users.

It works from non-admin users. I tested it.

It automatically uses the domain that the computer is a member of. Global Group membership is actually domain group membership.

Using netcommand/help gives very detailed descriptions of the switches. That is how I found out about the switch. If you just use /?, you will only get basic syntax help.

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that is not universal methode cause such script fails in case of other system language. e.g.: in russian language we have not Administrators but Администраторы (yes, i agree that is absolutly stupid but that is so in microsoft).

there is one more variant for cmd:

if not exist "%logonserver%\admin$\*.*" goto common_user

but experiments show it is not universal too, e.g.: the first administrator logon to system after windows setup (and possibly in many other cases like disabled admin shares via system registry and so on).

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To see if you are a member of the local administrators group use

net localgroup [admin group name] 

(w/o the brackets, if the group name has spaces use "" around the name).

If you are unsure of the groups use

net localgroup

And that will give you all the local groups on your computer. Then use the first command to see if you're a member. This can help you figure out if you have full admin rights or maybe just Power User rights.

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    It's possible that you are not directly a member of Administrators, but you are indirectly a member, through another group. This is true in my case, and therefore my name does not show up under Administrators even though I am a member of a group which itself is a member of Administrators. Aug 21, 2009 at 20:32
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    @Kevin: How would you check that out so ? Aug 22, 2009 at 9:51
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Actually, you just go and right-click any file and click "properties", then look at the security. This will give you a list of usergroups. Check if you're part of the admin usergroup or not and you'll know.

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