3

I use PuTTY to get to my Red Hat Linux 5.3 workstation from my Windows laptop.

Typically, if I want a new terminal on my Windows 7 workstation from another terminal or mc, I have to type start <ENTER>, and I will see a new terminal window running the default shell.

What is the equivalent command in Red Hat Linux 5.3 (and/or Solaris) to create a new terminal window from the command line? I will be entering this command from the shell prompt or mc's command line.

In Windows, if I want to start another terminal and in that terminal, I want to run a program, I can do "start program.exe arg1 arg2". This will create a new terminal window and runs program.exe in that terminal window. I don't have to create a terminal and then in a separate step run the program. How can I do this in Linux?

2
  • In Windows, if I want to start another terminal and in that terminal, I want to run a program, I can do "start program.exe arg1 arg2". this will create a new terminal window and runs program.exe in that terminal window. How can I do this in Linux ? May 18, 2011 at 15:23
  • Maybe add this as another question? Aug 1, 2011 at 9:57

3 Answers 3

2

If you're using PuTTY, I'd just duplicate the session.

Remember that PuTTY is a Windows application, and your Linux machine can't make a new Windows application instance.

If you have an X Window server (and you can download XMing XServer for free), you can run a few different terminals, including xterm, gnome-terminal or konsole, etc.

You can also use the same PuTTY window with multiple sessions with screen or tmux.

2
  • In Windows, if I want to start another terminal and in that terminal, I want to run a program, I can do "start program.exe arg1 arg2". this will create a new terminal window and runs program.exe in that terminal window. How can I do this in Linux ? May 18, 2011 at 15:23
  • @anjanbacchu terminal programs take the -e flag for a command xterm -e program arg1 arg2 should do it May 18, 2011 at 22:41
1

Unless you're running a X server on your Windows machine, you can't do this and will have to start a new instance of PuTTY. If you are for some reason running a X server then you can simply call the terminal emulator name followed by a &.

gnome-terminal &
1

screen is your friend.

You can have multiple sessions, each running independently.

You can even detach a screen session, log off and shut down your Windows PC completely, go home and start a putty session from home, and re-connect to the detached screen session which will still be running.

Screen is da boss!

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .