56

On Windows 7 Ultimate, is there a way to see when I logged on into the current session?

I want to find out how long I have been at the PC / when I started it up.

43

Use the following command in a Command Prompt:

net user [username]

It will be next to Last Logon.

EDIT
If your screen becomes locked and you use the method above it will display the last time the screen was unlocked. You will have to use this command below to get the initial login time:

quser
  • 6
    +1: "Net Statistics" tells you when the computer booted, not when the user logged in. – Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Jul 13 '11 at 16:03
  • 4
    This doesn't seem to work if your account is from a different domain than the default domain for the computer you're logged into. At least my attempts to specify a different domain to search didn't work. – Trebor Rude Nov 7 '14 at 18:05
  • 1
    Try net user %USERNAME% /domain, this worked when I was logged onto a domain. On another system, however, this command said it couldn't find the domain controller, but query user (or quser worked on that system) – PatS Jun 29 '18 at 14:16
80

You can also use

quser

to see the login time.

  • 3
    Nice, that's a new one to me. Turns out it's a 'shortcut' to another usable option: C:\>query user. – Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Jul 13 '11 at 16:52
  • 2
    Works for a domain user as well :) – thomasa88 Oct 5 '16 at 8:52
  • works on win 10 also – Carlo V. Dango Sep 22 '17 at 8:47
10

Go to the command prompt and type:

net statistics srv
  • The output I see says Statistics since 6/29/18 10:01:07 AM and since that is the only time shown, I'm guessing that is showing the time I logged in. Is that correct? The next answer says this was the time the computer was last rebooted, but in my case it appears to be the time I logged in. – PatS Jun 29 '18 at 14:22
  • The last option (srv) is language or installation specific. In my case it was "Arbeitsstationsdienst". Type net statistics without any additional option to get a list of available services. – schoetbi Dec 18 '18 at 7:25
5

I had the same issue for a network PC and this gave me results I was looking for:

wmic netlogin get name, fullname, lastlogon

...this will provide info for all users that have logged in.

  • FullName and LastLogon columns are empty in my case. Any idea why? – Dejan Aug 19 '17 at 1:27
  • The only one that told me when I signed in 15 minutes ago, not when I rebooted two days ago. – Noumenon May 1 '18 at 5:39
3

Do this at a command line, I think it will show what you want:

net statistics server

The "Statistics since 7/12/2011 6:28:15 PM" line is the last time the computer was rebooted.

3

You can also use

systeminfo

and next to

System Boot Time:

It will be in the format

9/17/2011, 10:16:38 PM
2

Use the command:

net stats srv

Where it says statistics since... is when you logged on/booted up.

1

i am not a computerwizard, i am regularly using a utility may be it will help you login timer showing the system boot time here link http://logintimer.weebly.com

  • 2
    This does exactly the same as the built-in quser, but is commercial. – slhck Oct 26 '12 at 12:44
-1

The exact answer probably depends on your exact situation.

The 'query user' or 'quser' command will show the last time you logged into the computer.

The 'net user ' command works, if you're not on a Domain. But (as someone else pointed out), this will show the last time you unlocked your screensaver.

If you're on a Domain, the 'net user /domain' command will show the last time that you logged into the Domain. But note that this time can differ from the last time you logged into the server.

If you sit down and power on your server every day, then the 'net statistics server' or 'net stats srv' command will show you the power-on time. Note that this time is not changed when the server hibernates or sleeps.

protected by Nifle May 18 '15 at 18:36

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