5

I have Windows Server 2008 R2 software mirror.

I boot from volume c:.

When i use:

bcdedit 

I can see 3 different "Windows Boot Loader" entries with "device partition=C:". How can I figure out which boot entry is related to which physical disk?

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {77777777-bbbb-bbbb-bbbb-bbbbbbbbbbbb}
device                  partition=C:
path                    \windows\system32\winload.exe
description             Windows Server 2008 R2 - secondary plex
locale                  en-us
inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
osdevice                partition=C:
systemroot              \windows
resumeobject            {55555555-bbbb-bbbb-bbbb-bbbbbbbbbbbb}
nx                      OptOut
detecthal               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {99999999-bbbb-bbbb-bbbb-bbbbbbbbbbbb}
device                  partition=C:
path                    \windows\system32\winload.exe
description             Windows Server 2008 R2 - secondary plex
locale                  en-us
inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
osdevice                partition=C:
systemroot              \windows
resumeobject            {55555555-bbbb-bbbb-bbbb-bbbbbbbbbbbb}
nx                      OptOut
detecthal               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {eeeeeeee-bbbb-bbbb-bbbb-bbbbbbbbbbbb}
device                  partition=C:
path                    \windows\system32\winload.exe
description             Windows Server 2008 R2 - secondary plex - secondary plex
locale                  en-us
inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
osdevice                partition=C:
systemroot              \windows
resumeobject            {55555555-bbbb-bbbb-bbbb-bbbbbbbbbbbb}
nx                      OptOut
detecthal               Yes
2
  • did your problem solved? or no ? is my answer helpful? +1 it please Oct 31, 2012 at 5:43
  • @ saber tabatabaee yazdi : its not. I commented under Your answer.
    – rumburak
    Oct 31, 2012 at 6:03

3 Answers 3

3

Use the undocumented /raw flag when running bcdedit /enum.

Instead of printing unknown, partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1 or partition=C: you will see output such as PartEx 6500000 HD MBR Sig:1a2b3c4d. This is showing you what is actually recorded in the BCD, as opposed to an interpretation of the data given currently accessible disks/partitions/filesystems.

The meaning in this case is "find the MBR disk with signature 1a2b3c4d and then look for the partition starting at byte offset 0x6500000".

There are other possible formats, for instance if your entry refers to a partition on a disk with a GPT partition table it will probably refer to the partition UUID.

(My heartfelt thanks to SS64.com which is the only place on the entire internet that documents this /raw flag. My heartfelt curses to Microsoft for failing to document this vital diagnostic option to bcdedit!).

1
  • Any idea in which version of Windows /raw was introduced? Windows 7 bcdedit seems to lack it. Nov 29, 2023 at 11:51
2
  1. Open a command prompt with administrator privileges.
  2. Run the following set of commands:

    DISKPART
    SELECT DISK 0
    UNIQUEID DISK ID=<random_disk_signature>
    

    (<random_disk_signature> is e.g. 1a2b3c4d)

  3. Quit DISKPART, but stay in the command prompt.
  4. Enter the following commands, one at a time, in the command prompt pressing Enter key after each command:

    bcdboot c:\windows /s c:
    bcdedit /set {DEFAULT.EN_US} device partition=c:
    bcdedit /set {DEFAULT.EN_US} osdevice partition=c:
    bcdedit /set {BOOTMGR.EN_US} device partition=c:
    
  5. Close the command prompt.

  6. Reboot.
7
  • @ saber tabatabaee yazdi : You can edit Your previous answer.
    – rumburak
    Oct 28, 2012 at 5:08
  • @rumburak : ok but deleting that seems much more better .. Oct 28, 2012 at 5:41
  • @ saber tabatabaee yazdi : How should I get boot disk with this ?
    – rumburak
    Oct 30, 2012 at 15:09
  • i'm confused this is impossible that 3 hard disk set as like this: multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS but one of them must known as multi(0)disk(1)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS and etc. see this en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTLDR Oct 31, 2012 at 6:37
  • fixmbr or fixboot or one of these solve your problem Oct 31, 2012 at 6:39
1

All 3 entries shown in bcdedit output point to same partition and disk.

To find out which partition (and disk) is mapped to c: you can use Windows DiskManagement or diskpart.exe on command prompt.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .