On a Windows 7 computer, running chkdsk /r /f C: in repair mode, it gives the error, Unspecified error 766f6c756d652e63 3f1. or something like that. I have tried the following:

  • uninstalling all antivirus software
  • scanning with MalwareByte's Anti-Malware
  • doing a Disk Cleanup
  • running Disk Defrag
  • booting TRK and running fsck -t ntfs (gives error Unsupported case. and not implemented).

I have also tried a System Restore, but there is a Temporary Internet file that appears to be in all restore points, and that file must be corrupted or something, because System Restore always grinds to a halt when it gets to that file.

What should I try next? Thanks in advance.

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    Check your HDD for errors using its manufacturer's utility. If your HDD has bad sectors (since you ran chkdsk /r), best to copy as much data off it as possible and replace the disk. Moreover, if it has bad sectors, stressing it further with defrag before getting your data off it is a really bad idea. – Karan Dec 8 '12 at 2:02
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    @Karan The problem has existed for a long time, and no files seem to be missing. Do you think that this error indicates a hardware failure? – BenjiWiebe Dec 8 '12 at 2:04
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    chkdsk /r /f C: in repair mode, it gives the error, Unspecified error 766f6c756d652e63 3f1. … booting TRK and running fsck -t ntfs (gives error Unsupported case. and not implemented). Hmm, it sounds like your file-system is damaged/corrupted. What you can try is to use a partition-management program to check the volume and possible repair it. Otherwise, you may want to copy your data (hopefully you won’t need to resort to a data-recovery program) and wipe it. – Synetech Dec 8 '12 at 2:04
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    @Karan, I agree with Benji. If it were an issue with bad sectors, then chkdsk would have said so because it is designed to detect such problems, but it is crashing instead. He’s probably using the /r switch because people always keeps saying to do it for every problem (just like how people keep saying to reinstall/repair-install for everything). – Synetech Dec 8 '12 at 2:05
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    @Synetech: I assumed the disk had bad sectors precisely because /r is being used. Since it locates bad sectors and recovers readable information, why else would one use that switch? If there's some other problem such as a corrupted file system, a reinstall should fix it. – Karan Dec 8 '12 at 2:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This might help. It has an answer from a Windows Support Engineer and he suggests starting the computer in Windows Recovery (WinRE) mode.

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    In the very first line of the question, he said he already did that: On a Windows 7 computer, running chkdsk /r /f C: in repair mode… – Synetech Dec 8 '12 at 6:19
  • I already did that... I have already come across that post that the link goes to. I think this may be the correct answer in most (but obviously not all) cases. – BenjiWiebe Dec 8 '12 at 15:51
  • @Synetech: There's a little more to the procedures described at the link I posted, as well as other links. – martineau Dec 8 '12 at 16:31
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    @Synetech: Well, excuse me, I felt it was important to read the instructions in context (and that the OP was perfectly capable of skipping any they had already done). – martineau Dec 8 '12 at 17:27
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    @Synetech: Ah, yes, all part of the context. Notice too that in my answer I said "might work". Perhaps part of the reason the MS support people constantly repeat those things is because it's using basic stuff built into Windows that everyone should make sure they've at least tried. – martineau Dec 8 '12 at 22:23

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