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I am planing a full backup in my computer using Acronis for the first time. I know that there are two kinds of backup softwares, one that can only copy the files and restore them, but cannot restore a complete windows installation, thus the user will have to reinstall everything, and the other kind that makes a image of the system, being able to restore all its files and the system itself as a whole. The question is: Does Acronis True Image always make a full system image (when I select full backup) or there is some hidden option I have to select? I know the software name says much, but I just want to confirm.

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Acronis True Image does both of the backups you described.

  • File Backups: Only files and folders are compressed and stored
  • Disk/Partition Images: Stores a sector-by-sector snapshot of the disk or partition. This will include the operating system, drivers, registry, application, files, and any of your configuration

To do a complete backup (Disk/Partition), make sure you select Disk and partition backup on the Backup and recovery tab

See the Acronis user manual at http://www.acronis.com/support/documentation/ (under Acronis True Image Home) for more information

  • I have a SSD with my windows and a HDD with my files...if I do a partition backup, how the sector by sector will behave? – mFeinstein Feb 6 '13 at 17:40
  • Do a disk/partition backup of your SSD, since all your system files are there. If your HDD only contains your personal data (images, documents, music, etc.), do a file backup for the HDD. – Tuan Feb 7 '13 at 2:48
  • I did a disk backup for both o them, just did 2 different backups, one for the SSD and one for the HDD, so I believe this way each backup will have its own aligment – mFeinstein Feb 8 '13 at 3:04
  • I will accept it, usually I just wait some days in case someone else shows up with a different perspective. – mFeinstein Feb 8 '13 at 14:34

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