0

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/290938 says press F6 to :

Move the focus to select the following areas of the window:
Active tab of the Ribbon
Any open task panes
Status bar at the bottom of the window
Your document

This all works except for the document. I want a keyboard shortcut to put the focus on my document so I can immediately begin to edit the last place the cursor was. Specifically, when I do a Control-F Find, I want to be able to jump right back to my document without touching the mouse.

What do I bind to for this?

  • F6 actually works fine for me in Word 2010 to eventually give focus back to the document. If you revert to the old Find and Replace dialog, you can simply press Esc to dismiss it once you're done searching/replacing. – Karan Mar 7 '13 at 4:24
0

I tried pressing the F6 key, which is used in Access to switch between different panes. It works, but to switch back to the current document, you have to tap it three times: F6 F6 F6. Your next keystroke will replace the 'found' word.

0

While the F6 key brings the focus to the document, the blinking cursor is invisible and gives no evidence of focus, thus sending the user in an endless toggling loop of confusion. The two methods below bring immediate focus to the document without any guesswork:

METHOD 1

  1. Windows Key + number [1-9] (ordinal position of the Word icon on the task bar)(if 3rd icon, Windows Key + 3)
  2. Windows Key + number [1-9] (to toggle min/max mode)
  3. Start editing (1st highlighted text)

METHOD 2

  1. Windows Key + T (to bring up the task bar)
  2. --> (arrow to Word icon)
  3. Enter
  4. Start editing (1st highlighted text)

NOTE

  • Drag Word icon on the task bar (for more convenient number key location)
  • Ctrl + Spacebar + C (to escape out of Search window pane and return to the edit position)
  • 1
    OP wants to come back to the same place where the cursor is in open document not to the Icon – Sam May 22 '17 at 8:07
  • I think the OP wanted to be able to edit the document after conducting a search in the windows pane, which entails getting the focus back to the document. I edited my post to indicate that thought process. – udo young May 24 '17 at 4:25
  • This was my first post in this forum, so I wanted to make a good first impression ;~p – udo young May 24 '17 at 4:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.